Event Title

Integration of community input with science based restoration to create successful projects at shoreline park sites

Presentation Abstract

Involving stakeholders and community communications in Salish Sea restoration projects takes many forms and can be successfully integrated with science based restoration. Community involvement is of particular importance on projects that utilize existing shoreline parks or other public properties. The use of park sites can be a win-win for park users and habitat as long as current and potential future uses of the site by the public are understood and accommodated by the design. The City of Bainbridge Island used web based surveys, public outreach at community events, open house events and a day long design charrette to solicit feedback from the community to inform designs of four shoreline restoration projects. This input was integrated with science based habitat restoration techniques to develop project designs. This has resulted in built projects that restore shoreline process, improve habitat quality and increase park use. Other benefits of this approach include greater willingness of elected officials to approve restoration on park properties, opportunities to leverage restoration funding with recreation funding, and the use of expedited permitting processes for project elements that traditionally may not be recognized as habitat restoration if permitted independently. These projects presented opportunities to combine funding from sources with a variety of missions including; habitat restoration, recreation, public lands conservation, and environmental clean-up. The sites also included tremendous opportunities to provide education on the natural history, indigenous peoples historic use of the site and industrial history of the (now) park sites.

Session Title

Insights from Community-Based Approaches to Salish Sea Restoration Projects

Conference Track

SSE6: Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE6-362

Start Date

5-4-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 2:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 2:30 PM Apr 5th, 2:45 PM

Integration of community input with science based restoration to create successful projects at shoreline park sites

Involving stakeholders and community communications in Salish Sea restoration projects takes many forms and can be successfully integrated with science based restoration. Community involvement is of particular importance on projects that utilize existing shoreline parks or other public properties. The use of park sites can be a win-win for park users and habitat as long as current and potential future uses of the site by the public are understood and accommodated by the design. The City of Bainbridge Island used web based surveys, public outreach at community events, open house events and a day long design charrette to solicit feedback from the community to inform designs of four shoreline restoration projects. This input was integrated with science based habitat restoration techniques to develop project designs. This has resulted in built projects that restore shoreline process, improve habitat quality and increase park use. Other benefits of this approach include greater willingness of elected officials to approve restoration on park properties, opportunities to leverage restoration funding with recreation funding, and the use of expedited permitting processes for project elements that traditionally may not be recognized as habitat restoration if permitted independently. These projects presented opportunities to combine funding from sources with a variety of missions including; habitat restoration, recreation, public lands conservation, and environmental clean-up. The sites also included tremendous opportunities to provide education on the natural history, indigenous peoples historic use of the site and industrial history of the (now) park sites.