Event Title

Assessing the threat of contaminants of emerging concern to early marine survival of Chinook salmon

Presentation Abstract

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and a number of industrial compounds, such as alkylphenols, bisphenol A, phthalates, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and current-use pesticides, are all contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in aquatic habitats, regionally and globally. CECs enter our rivers, estuaries, and marine habitats from various sources, including discharges from wastewater treatment plants, aquaculture operations, industrial outfalls and stormwater outfalls, as well as surface stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces, landfills, agricultural lands, and lands where biosolids were applied. However, the environmental fate and toxicity of CECs to biota are not well understood. To provide an initial assessment of CECs in juvenile Chinook salmon in Puget Sound, we measured concentrations of CECs in 15 whole body samples of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) out-migrating through river, estuary, and nearshore marine habitats from five Puget Sound river systems in 2013. Collectively, 48 of 194 chemicals were detected, generally with more CECs detected in salmon that had migrated through urban than non-urban areas. Overall, antibiotics, alkylphenols, PFCs, and antidepressants were all frequently detected. Fifteen different antibiotics were detected; at least one antibiotic was detected in all samples, however the mean number of antibiotics detected at each river system ranged from two to five. Five different types of antidepressants were detected, however, they were not detected in salmon from all river systems. Based on predicted fish plasma concentrations of PPCPs, which were compared to effective pharmaceutical doses for human plasma, we concluded that several of the CECs detected in juvenile Chinook salmon were high enough to potentially impair health of salmon residing temporarily in estuarine and nearshore habitats of Puget Sound, possibly reducing their marine survival.

Session Title

Occurrence and impacts of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-569

Start Date

5-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 3:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:45 PM

Assessing the threat of contaminants of emerging concern to early marine survival of Chinook salmon

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and a number of industrial compounds, such as alkylphenols, bisphenol A, phthalates, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and current-use pesticides, are all contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in aquatic habitats, regionally and globally. CECs enter our rivers, estuaries, and marine habitats from various sources, including discharges from wastewater treatment plants, aquaculture operations, industrial outfalls and stormwater outfalls, as well as surface stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces, landfills, agricultural lands, and lands where biosolids were applied. However, the environmental fate and toxicity of CECs to biota are not well understood. To provide an initial assessment of CECs in juvenile Chinook salmon in Puget Sound, we measured concentrations of CECs in 15 whole body samples of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) out-migrating through river, estuary, and nearshore marine habitats from five Puget Sound river systems in 2013. Collectively, 48 of 194 chemicals were detected, generally with more CECs detected in salmon that had migrated through urban than non-urban areas. Overall, antibiotics, alkylphenols, PFCs, and antidepressants were all frequently detected. Fifteen different antibiotics were detected; at least one antibiotic was detected in all samples, however the mean number of antibiotics detected at each river system ranged from two to five. Five different types of antidepressants were detected, however, they were not detected in salmon from all river systems. Based on predicted fish plasma concentrations of PPCPs, which were compared to effective pharmaceutical doses for human plasma, we concluded that several of the CECs detected in juvenile Chinook salmon were high enough to potentially impair health of salmon residing temporarily in estuarine and nearshore habitats of Puget Sound, possibly reducing their marine survival.