Presentation Abstract

The temporal and spatial distribution of dissolved and particulate PBDEs seawater concentration has been monitored in the Strait of Georgia (SoG) since 2013. We aim to determine the sources, sinks and biogeochemical cycling of PBDE congeners in the water column in SoG. Particulate PBDEs concentrations show high temporal and spatial variability, indicating that the outfalls from the waste water treatment plants are major point sources. Changes in congener distributions in relation to total particulate PBDE concentrations suggest that the less brominated congeners desorb from sewage particles and add to the dissolved PBDEs pool more rapidly than the more brominated congeners. We also measured very low particulate PBDE concentrations during phytoplankton blooms, which suggest slow kinetics of adsorption or uptake of dissolved PBDEs by phytoplankton. In contrast, the concentrations of dissolved PBDEs in the SoG are more uniform and indicate that the outfalls from waste water treatment plants are not major direct point sources. Other potential sources include atmospheric deposition and desorption from effluent particles after their dispersion. A depth profile of dissolved PBDEs shows higher concentrations of the BDE-47, 99 and 153 at the surface, indicating contributions from the atmosphere or from the Fraser River. However, their highest concentrations were found at, or above, the buoyancy depth of the outfall plume from the Iona Waste Water Treatment Plant. Results obtained to date suggest a differential partitioning of PBDE congeners after their discharge from waste water treatment plants. Less brominated congeners are preferentially desorbed from sewage particles and are preferentially transported towards the surface by the estuarine circulation of the SoG, while the more brominated congeners predominantly remain associated with particles and accumulate on the seafloor. This working hypothesis will be further tested by measuring the kinetics of adsorption/desorption of PBDEs on phytoplankton and sewage particles using C-14 labelled PBDE congeners.

Session Title

Occurrence and impacts of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in the Salish Sea

Keywords

PBDEs, Strait of Georgia, Sinking flux, Adsorption-desorption kinetics, Depth profile

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-119

Start Date

5-4-2018 3:45 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 4:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 3:45 PM Apr 5th, 4:00 PM

Biogeochemical cycling of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the Strait of Georgia

The temporal and spatial distribution of dissolved and particulate PBDEs seawater concentration has been monitored in the Strait of Georgia (SoG) since 2013. We aim to determine the sources, sinks and biogeochemical cycling of PBDE congeners in the water column in SoG. Particulate PBDEs concentrations show high temporal and spatial variability, indicating that the outfalls from the waste water treatment plants are major point sources. Changes in congener distributions in relation to total particulate PBDE concentrations suggest that the less brominated congeners desorb from sewage particles and add to the dissolved PBDEs pool more rapidly than the more brominated congeners. We also measured very low particulate PBDE concentrations during phytoplankton blooms, which suggest slow kinetics of adsorption or uptake of dissolved PBDEs by phytoplankton. In contrast, the concentrations of dissolved PBDEs in the SoG are more uniform and indicate that the outfalls from waste water treatment plants are not major direct point sources. Other potential sources include atmospheric deposition and desorption from effluent particles after their dispersion. A depth profile of dissolved PBDEs shows higher concentrations of the BDE-47, 99 and 153 at the surface, indicating contributions from the atmosphere or from the Fraser River. However, their highest concentrations were found at, or above, the buoyancy depth of the outfall plume from the Iona Waste Water Treatment Plant. Results obtained to date suggest a differential partitioning of PBDE congeners after their discharge from waste water treatment plants. Less brominated congeners are preferentially desorbed from sewage particles and are preferentially transported towards the surface by the estuarine circulation of the SoG, while the more brominated congeners predominantly remain associated with particles and accumulate on the seafloor. This working hypothesis will be further tested by measuring the kinetics of adsorption/desorption of PBDEs on phytoplankton and sewage particles using C-14 labelled PBDE congeners.