Presentation Abstract

French Slough provides a challenging but familiar environment for ecosystem recovery. Historical floodplain modification has created chronic water quality and fish passage problems within a 4,000 acre floodplain ecosystem. Levees, pumping, and beaver suppression are required to sustain duck hunting clubs and agricultural operations. Episodic government-led planning efforts have alienated landowners with prolonged processes, heavy with spectators, but always short on capacity. Floodplain regulations are complicated, layered, and political. Sea levels are rising, and population pressures are relentless. What are the tools and relationships necessary to recover the French Slough ecosystem? How can French Slough help us learn about the necessary evolution of our own ecosystem recovery systems? Coordinated Investment is an ongoing initiative staffed by NOAA Restoration Center to use on-the-ground work to cultivate our ecosystem recovery capabilities. The French Slough effort is ostensibly focused on developing systematic methods for permitting ditch management in prior-converted floodplain wetlands following model work by the Whatcom Conservation District. Ultimately French Slough asks us questions about how we allocate capacity, implement authority, manage information, and envision the future.

Session Title

Building Resilient Floodplains through Regional Policy, Community-driven Solutions and Science: The Story of Integrated Floodplain Management

Keywords

Floodplain design, Floodplains, Agency coordination

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-12

Start Date

5-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 4:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 4:00 PM Apr 5th, 4:15 PM

Agency silos, cultural isolation, and integrated floodplain design: the French Slough case study

French Slough provides a challenging but familiar environment for ecosystem recovery. Historical floodplain modification has created chronic water quality and fish passage problems within a 4,000 acre floodplain ecosystem. Levees, pumping, and beaver suppression are required to sustain duck hunting clubs and agricultural operations. Episodic government-led planning efforts have alienated landowners with prolonged processes, heavy with spectators, but always short on capacity. Floodplain regulations are complicated, layered, and political. Sea levels are rising, and population pressures are relentless. What are the tools and relationships necessary to recover the French Slough ecosystem? How can French Slough help us learn about the necessary evolution of our own ecosystem recovery systems? Coordinated Investment is an ongoing initiative staffed by NOAA Restoration Center to use on-the-ground work to cultivate our ecosystem recovery capabilities. The French Slough effort is ostensibly focused on developing systematic methods for permitting ditch management in prior-converted floodplain wetlands following model work by the Whatcom Conservation District. Ultimately French Slough asks us questions about how we allocate capacity, implement authority, manage information, and envision the future.