Presentation Abstract

Citizen science is becoming more broadly recognized as an important means of gathering scientific data. Blending scientific data gaps with the strengths of citizen science will result in meaningful data that can inform policy for resource management agencies. In addition, using volunteers builds a base of citizens with improved understanding of complex ecological and policy issues. Here, we present a case study of an intertidal monitoring program in the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve that has developed and adapted a robust citizen science program over the past 5 years. This program will be incorporated into the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Management Plan that will be updated in 2020. In addition, the data from the monitoring program will be available for use by oil spill response plans for industries adjacent to the Aquatic Reserve. Many transferable lessons have been learned in this program about training citizen scientists, retaining volunteers, increasing confidence in collected data, and using data visualization software to better communicate information back to participants, decision makers, and the general public, all while functioning on a limited budget.

Session Title

Building Effective Citizen Science Projects for the Collection of Influential Data

Keywords

Citizen science, Intertidal monitoring

Conference Track

SSE15: Data and Information Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE15-626

Start Date

5-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 4:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 4:00 PM Apr 5th, 4:15 PM

Effective application of citizen science for adaptive management of an aquatic marine reserve

Citizen science is becoming more broadly recognized as an important means of gathering scientific data. Blending scientific data gaps with the strengths of citizen science will result in meaningful data that can inform policy for resource management agencies. In addition, using volunteers builds a base of citizens with improved understanding of complex ecological and policy issues. Here, we present a case study of an intertidal monitoring program in the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve that has developed and adapted a robust citizen science program over the past 5 years. This program will be incorporated into the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Management Plan that will be updated in 2020. In addition, the data from the monitoring program will be available for use by oil spill response plans for industries adjacent to the Aquatic Reserve. Many transferable lessons have been learned in this program about training citizen scientists, retaining volunteers, increasing confidence in collected data, and using data visualization software to better communicate information back to participants, decision makers, and the general public, all while functioning on a limited budget.