Presentation Abstract

Under the World Class Tanker Safety System Initiative (WCTSS) a national framework was developed to identify marine biological organisms most vulnerable to ship-source oil spills. The Pacific regional application of this framework identified 27 highly vulnerable biological groups, with sea grasses, salt marsh grasses/succulents, sea otters, and baleen whales at the top of the list. A gap analysis during the Pacific regional application identified critical species data gaps that must now be filled to ensure effective response in marine oil spill emergencies. In the absence of robust species distribution and abundance data, habitat suitability models can be used to predict this information using environmental spatial data layers and limited species distribution data. The Oceans Protection Plan (OPP) Habitat Suitability Modelling team is developing a workbook of standardized habitat suitability modelling approaches to illustrate how critical species data gaps may be filled. This workbook will include recommendations for data requirements, models to use, and how to deal with modelling challenges. Models will be developed and tested using data from Canada’s North Central Coast study area and then applied in the Salish Sea to the Strait of Georgia study area in support of the south coast Area Response Plan. In addition to the modelling workbook and model predictions, another major output of this project is the extension of bottom type classification layers from 50-200 m depth, which will be useful for other marine spatial planning analyses. The habitat suitability modelling workbook, model predictions, and extended bottom type classification layers will serve as valuable pieces in the larger puzzle of international transboundary ecosystem protection and recovery.

Session Title

Federal Initiatives II: Oceans Protection Plan (OPP)

Keywords

Habitat suitability model, species distribution model, Oceans Protection Program, Area Response Plan, Regional Response Plan, oil spill, vulnerability assessment, Strait of Georgia, Salish

Conference Track

SSE9: Transboundary Management and Policy

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE9-441

Start Date

5-4-2018 4:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 4:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 4:30 PM Apr 5th, 4:45 PM

Oil spill preparedness planning: filling critical species data gaps using habitat suitability modelling

Under the World Class Tanker Safety System Initiative (WCTSS) a national framework was developed to identify marine biological organisms most vulnerable to ship-source oil spills. The Pacific regional application of this framework identified 27 highly vulnerable biological groups, with sea grasses, salt marsh grasses/succulents, sea otters, and baleen whales at the top of the list. A gap analysis during the Pacific regional application identified critical species data gaps that must now be filled to ensure effective response in marine oil spill emergencies. In the absence of robust species distribution and abundance data, habitat suitability models can be used to predict this information using environmental spatial data layers and limited species distribution data. The Oceans Protection Plan (OPP) Habitat Suitability Modelling team is developing a workbook of standardized habitat suitability modelling approaches to illustrate how critical species data gaps may be filled. This workbook will include recommendations for data requirements, models to use, and how to deal with modelling challenges. Models will be developed and tested using data from Canada’s North Central Coast study area and then applied in the Salish Sea to the Strait of Georgia study area in support of the south coast Area Response Plan. In addition to the modelling workbook and model predictions, another major output of this project is the extension of bottom type classification layers from 50-200 m depth, which will be useful for other marine spatial planning analyses. The habitat suitability modelling workbook, model predictions, and extended bottom type classification layers will serve as valuable pieces in the larger puzzle of international transboundary ecosystem protection and recovery.