Presentation Abstract

The Skagit Hydrodynamic Model Project was initiated by the Farms, Fish, and Flood Initiative (3FI) to conduct a landscape-scale alternative analysis in the Skagit River delta region. Twenty-three proposed restoration projects were assessed based on a number of quantitative indicators identified by representatives from each interest (Farm, Fish, and Flood). The study area focused on the Skagit River delta downstream of Mount Vernon, Washington. This reach of the Skagit River is tidally influenced and includes both the North Fork and South Fork distributaries, Skagit Bay, Padilla Bay, and the Swinomish Channel. The study area indirectly included approximately 55,000 acres of highly productive sub-tidal farmland. Several indicators were developed for the alternatives analysis to evaluate restoration concepts under a variety of flow and tidal conditions and under a climate change scenario. These indicators were directly informed using output from the Salish sea hydrodynamic model (HDM) using a normalized scoring methodology. This presentation will provide detail about how our team used output from the HDM to quantify indicators. It will also present how our team evaluated potential system- wide changes to water surface elevation, the balance of flow between the major distributaries, and salinity due to implementation of large restoration concepts, groups of projects and how we accounted for these system wide changes in our indicators. Finally, results from the climate change analysis and how we evaluated potential future impacts to habitat and agricultural practices will be presented.

Session Title

Understanding the Salish Sea Model and its Application for Puget Sound Recovery

Conference Track

SSE15: Data and Information Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE15-44

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 2:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 2:30 PM Apr 4th, 2:45 PM

Skagit Delta alternatives analysis: using output from the Salish Sea hydrodynamic model to quantify benefits and impacts of restoration project concepts

The Skagit Hydrodynamic Model Project was initiated by the Farms, Fish, and Flood Initiative (3FI) to conduct a landscape-scale alternative analysis in the Skagit River delta region. Twenty-three proposed restoration projects were assessed based on a number of quantitative indicators identified by representatives from each interest (Farm, Fish, and Flood). The study area focused on the Skagit River delta downstream of Mount Vernon, Washington. This reach of the Skagit River is tidally influenced and includes both the North Fork and South Fork distributaries, Skagit Bay, Padilla Bay, and the Swinomish Channel. The study area indirectly included approximately 55,000 acres of highly productive sub-tidal farmland. Several indicators were developed for the alternatives analysis to evaluate restoration concepts under a variety of flow and tidal conditions and under a climate change scenario. These indicators were directly informed using output from the Salish sea hydrodynamic model (HDM) using a normalized scoring methodology. This presentation will provide detail about how our team used output from the HDM to quantify indicators. It will also present how our team evaluated potential system- wide changes to water surface elevation, the balance of flow between the major distributaries, and salinity due to implementation of large restoration concepts, groups of projects and how we accounted for these system wide changes in our indicators. Finally, results from the climate change analysis and how we evaluated potential future impacts to habitat and agricultural practices will be presented.