Presentation Abstract

Conspicuous declines in the abundance of bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), the most common canopy-forming species in Puget Sound, have been observed in many areas. Despite these observations, little information on abundance, or temporal changes in kelp distribution have been scientifically documented. To document and increase attention to changes in kelp populations around the region, the Northwest Straits Initiative formed a Salish Sea International Kelp Alliance and developed a scientifically-driven monitoring protocol. Citizen scientists of the Northwest Straits Marine Resources Committees then applied the protocol to delineate kelp beds via kayak over the summers of 2015-2107. The protocol has now been added to the Washington State Puget Sound Estuarine Monitoring Program PSEMP Nearshore Monitoring Toolbox and is very similar to protocols used by citizen science groups in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia. This presentation provides a summary of results on changes in extent observed throughout summer months, as well as, changes observed over the 3 years of sampling. To date, more than 177 Bull kelp kayak surveys, at 42 sites, have been acquired in 7 counties of the Northwest Straits over 3 summers. Fourteen of the sites have a full 3 years of data on presence/absence, acreage and ancillary measurements of depth and temperature. Data will be made available from the Northwest Straits online mapping application SoundIQ linked to interactive maps, data, photos and summary results in Storymap format.

Session Title

Kelp Distribution and Recovery Strategies in the Salish Sea: Part I

Keywords

Bull kelp, MRC, Northwest Straits Initiative, Nereocystis

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-554

Start Date

6-4-2018 9:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 9:30 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 9:15 AM Apr 6th, 9:30 AM

Monitoring Salish Sea bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) via kayak surveys

Conspicuous declines in the abundance of bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), the most common canopy-forming species in Puget Sound, have been observed in many areas. Despite these observations, little information on abundance, or temporal changes in kelp distribution have been scientifically documented. To document and increase attention to changes in kelp populations around the region, the Northwest Straits Initiative formed a Salish Sea International Kelp Alliance and developed a scientifically-driven monitoring protocol. Citizen scientists of the Northwest Straits Marine Resources Committees then applied the protocol to delineate kelp beds via kayak over the summers of 2015-2107. The protocol has now been added to the Washington State Puget Sound Estuarine Monitoring Program PSEMP Nearshore Monitoring Toolbox and is very similar to protocols used by citizen science groups in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia. This presentation provides a summary of results on changes in extent observed throughout summer months, as well as, changes observed over the 3 years of sampling. To date, more than 177 Bull kelp kayak surveys, at 42 sites, have been acquired in 7 counties of the Northwest Straits over 3 summers. Fourteen of the sites have a full 3 years of data on presence/absence, acreage and ancillary measurements of depth and temperature. Data will be made available from the Northwest Straits online mapping application SoundIQ linked to interactive maps, data, photos and summary results in Storymap format.