Presentation Abstract

In 2016 and 2017 Wild Fish Conservancy collected data as part of a 3-year assessment of marine nearshore outmigration patterns for juvenile Hood Canal summer run chum (Oncorhynchus keta). The goal of the assessment is to provide a scientific basis for the selection and prioritization of future nearshore habitat restoration and protection projects throughout the Hood Canal summer chum Evolutionarily Significant Unit. Data was collected at 46 sites, which were sampled weekly with beach seines from late December through May; sites are throughout the Hood Canal, Admiralty Inlet, and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca. At each site water quality parameters including temperature and salinity are collected. Genetic analysis of fin clips from a subsample of fish allows for a retrospective assignment of life history type (summer run vs. fall run), this is important as only the summer run of Hood Canal chum are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Results show widespread use of nearshore habitat by summer run chum, even at sites that are distant from natal streams. Genetic results also show significant reverse migration, where fish natal to streams closer to the Pacific Ocean are captured at sites further up Hood Canal. The first two years of data indicate that juvenile summer run chum salmon show a preference for two types of habitat: 1) large river natal deltas and associated wetlands, and 2) coastal salt marshes with no/small natal populations.

Session Title

Salmon and their Habitats

Keywords

Hood Canal summer chum, Nearshore habitat

Conference Track

SSE11: Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE11-389

Start Date

6-4-2018 9:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 9:30 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 9:15 AM Apr 6th, 9:30 AM

Nearshore habitat use by Hood Canal Summer run chum salmon in Hood Canal and the Strait of Juan de Fuca

In 2016 and 2017 Wild Fish Conservancy collected data as part of a 3-year assessment of marine nearshore outmigration patterns for juvenile Hood Canal summer run chum (Oncorhynchus keta). The goal of the assessment is to provide a scientific basis for the selection and prioritization of future nearshore habitat restoration and protection projects throughout the Hood Canal summer chum Evolutionarily Significant Unit. Data was collected at 46 sites, which were sampled weekly with beach seines from late December through May; sites are throughout the Hood Canal, Admiralty Inlet, and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca. At each site water quality parameters including temperature and salinity are collected. Genetic analysis of fin clips from a subsample of fish allows for a retrospective assignment of life history type (summer run vs. fall run), this is important as only the summer run of Hood Canal chum are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Results show widespread use of nearshore habitat by summer run chum, even at sites that are distant from natal streams. Genetic results also show significant reverse migration, where fish natal to streams closer to the Pacific Ocean are captured at sites further up Hood Canal. The first two years of data indicate that juvenile summer run chum salmon show a preference for two types of habitat: 1) large river natal deltas and associated wetlands, and 2) coastal salt marshes with no/small natal populations.