Presentation Abstract

Samish people have been stewards of the environment in the San Juan Archipelago for hundreds of generations. As a Coast Salish Tribe, Samish culture and traditions are intimately tied to resources and places in the Salish Sea. Every beach in Samish Traditional Territory has seen footprints of the ancestors. Honoring traditional ways while preserving cultural use materials and foods for future generations is a cornerstone that guides the work of Samish DNR. In the past 4 years, Samish DNR in partnership with Washington DNR, Washington Conservation Corps, Veterans Conservation Corps, and Earthcorps, have removed over 580,000 pounds of creosote and marine debris from shorelines of Skagit County, Island County, Southern Whatcom County and San Juan County. This program has been so effective because of strong partner relationships, team work and pre-cleanup data collection. In 2017, Samish DNR surveyed islands for creosote and marine debris to help expedite the cleanup effort. This had not been done in the previous years. Using this method, Samish DNR identified 325 sites within the San Juan Islands. Many of the sites were found in areas we had previously cleaned. By completing this survey, we prioritize our cleanup efforts and remove debris from the largest contaminated areas. For 2018, we are likely to see another productive year of creosote and marine debris assessment and clean up. There is still territory to cover, and often, marine debris washes up on the same beaches every year. We will continue to build strong relationships with partners and landowners to remove marine debris from Samish Traditional Territory. This will ensure that generations to come will be able to continue utilizing the bountiful natural resources of the Salish Sea that is such an important part of Samish cultural identity.

Session Title

The Application and Creation of Knowledge that Leads to Action to Restore and Protect an Ecosystem

Keywords

Marine debris, Creosote clean up, Samish traditional territory

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-96

Start Date

6-4-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 9:45 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 9:30 AM Apr 6th, 9:45 AM

Samish Indian Nation Department of Natural Resources' efforts to remove marine debris and creosote using GIS in the San Juan Archipelago, Washington State

Samish people have been stewards of the environment in the San Juan Archipelago for hundreds of generations. As a Coast Salish Tribe, Samish culture and traditions are intimately tied to resources and places in the Salish Sea. Every beach in Samish Traditional Territory has seen footprints of the ancestors. Honoring traditional ways while preserving cultural use materials and foods for future generations is a cornerstone that guides the work of Samish DNR. In the past 4 years, Samish DNR in partnership with Washington DNR, Washington Conservation Corps, Veterans Conservation Corps, and Earthcorps, have removed over 580,000 pounds of creosote and marine debris from shorelines of Skagit County, Island County, Southern Whatcom County and San Juan County. This program has been so effective because of strong partner relationships, team work and pre-cleanup data collection. In 2017, Samish DNR surveyed islands for creosote and marine debris to help expedite the cleanup effort. This had not been done in the previous years. Using this method, Samish DNR identified 325 sites within the San Juan Islands. Many of the sites were found in areas we had previously cleaned. By completing this survey, we prioritize our cleanup efforts and remove debris from the largest contaminated areas. For 2018, we are likely to see another productive year of creosote and marine debris assessment and clean up. There is still territory to cover, and often, marine debris washes up on the same beaches every year. We will continue to build strong relationships with partners and landowners to remove marine debris from Samish Traditional Territory. This will ensure that generations to come will be able to continue utilizing the bountiful natural resources of the Salish Sea that is such an important part of Samish cultural identity.