Presentation Abstract

The Citizen Science Program was initiated by the Pacific Salmon Foundation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Ocean Networks Canada in 2015. This Program was designed to achieve oceanographic monitoring of the Strait of Georgia on temporal and spatial scale that had never been done before. Samples and measurements were taken at approximately 80 sites on a bi-monthly (or higher) frequency from February to October, 2015 to 2017. This presentation will be focused on the spatial and temporal distribution of harmful algae based on the analysis of about 5000 phytoplankton samples. Preliminary results indicate that during the sampling period in the Strait, there were no significant (>1000 cells per mL) Heterosigma akashiwo blooms. Very high levels of Chaetoceros convolutus/concavicornis were recorded in spring 2015 in northern areas of the Strait. Low and moderate levels of non-skeletal Dictyocha were observed from June to August 2016 and during August 2017 at most of the sampling areas. Further work will include investigating relationships between harmful algae cell densities and environmental variables (nutrients, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, etc.). One of the major goals of the Program is to provide data aiding in assessing the potential effects of harmful algal blooms on the juvenile salmon survival in the Salish Sea.

Session Title

Harmful Phytoplankton in the Salish Sea: Part I

Keywords

phytoplankton, harmful algal blooms, HAB, Heterosigma, Strait of Georgia

Conference Track

SSE5: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, and Research

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE5-487

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 2:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 2:30 PM Apr 4th, 2:45 PM

Harmful algae in the Strait of Georgia, citizen science data

The Citizen Science Program was initiated by the Pacific Salmon Foundation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Ocean Networks Canada in 2015. This Program was designed to achieve oceanographic monitoring of the Strait of Georgia on temporal and spatial scale that had never been done before. Samples and measurements were taken at approximately 80 sites on a bi-monthly (or higher) frequency from February to October, 2015 to 2017. This presentation will be focused on the spatial and temporal distribution of harmful algae based on the analysis of about 5000 phytoplankton samples. Preliminary results indicate that during the sampling period in the Strait, there were no significant (>1000 cells per mL) Heterosigma akashiwo blooms. Very high levels of Chaetoceros convolutus/concavicornis were recorded in spring 2015 in northern areas of the Strait. Low and moderate levels of non-skeletal Dictyocha were observed from June to August 2016 and during August 2017 at most of the sampling areas. Further work will include investigating relationships between harmful algae cell densities and environmental variables (nutrients, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, etc.). One of the major goals of the Program is to provide data aiding in assessing the potential effects of harmful algal blooms on the juvenile salmon survival in the Salish Sea.