Presentation Abstract

Traditional information-based campaigns, programs of voluntary incentive-based technical and financial assistance and regulatory compulsion have proved moderately effective in the past to abate bacterial pollution from livestock operations. These have been an industry standard for decades as the exclusive means to motivate land managers to adopt stewardship practices. These methods have failed to sustain reductions in bacteria from farms primarily because they leave 60% of the target audience unengaged. Widespread adoption of better livestock and manure management practices can reduce fecal coliform bacteria in both fresh and marine waters. However, to achieve and maintain Approved shellfish growing areas, land stewardship must be sustained by building trust, developing social norms, and nurturing values associated with clean water. Whatcom Conservation District has been assisting landowners in with their conservation choices since 1946, to foster a healthy, sustainable relationship between people and the environment, and has been working in Drayton Harbor since 2006. Along the way, the District has adapted its traditional incentive-based programming and marketed a variety of programs that have increased adoption of Best Management Practices and values associated with good water quality. Program success requires adaptation to local demographics, resource concerns, existing conservation initiatives and most importantly the cultural values associated with that community. In this session, we will explore lessons learned, adaptive management strategies, and results of the robust education and technical assistance program in the Drayton Harbor community that have resulted in extensive adoption of best management practices to improve and sustain water quality.

Session Title

Drayton Harbor Shellfish Recovery: A Case Study of Local Collaboration

Keywords

Farm stewardship

Conference Track

SSE2: Collaboration and Engagement

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE2-376

Start Date

6-4-2018 9:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 10:00 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 9:45 AM Apr 6th, 10:00 AM

Inspiring farm conservation stewardship: adaptations to incentive-based campaigns

Traditional information-based campaigns, programs of voluntary incentive-based technical and financial assistance and regulatory compulsion have proved moderately effective in the past to abate bacterial pollution from livestock operations. These have been an industry standard for decades as the exclusive means to motivate land managers to adopt stewardship practices. These methods have failed to sustain reductions in bacteria from farms primarily because they leave 60% of the target audience unengaged. Widespread adoption of better livestock and manure management practices can reduce fecal coliform bacteria in both fresh and marine waters. However, to achieve and maintain Approved shellfish growing areas, land stewardship must be sustained by building trust, developing social norms, and nurturing values associated with clean water. Whatcom Conservation District has been assisting landowners in with their conservation choices since 1946, to foster a healthy, sustainable relationship between people and the environment, and has been working in Drayton Harbor since 2006. Along the way, the District has adapted its traditional incentive-based programming and marketed a variety of programs that have increased adoption of Best Management Practices and values associated with good water quality. Program success requires adaptation to local demographics, resource concerns, existing conservation initiatives and most importantly the cultural values associated with that community. In this session, we will explore lessons learned, adaptive management strategies, and results of the robust education and technical assistance program in the Drayton Harbor community that have resulted in extensive adoption of best management practices to improve and sustain water quality.