Presentation Abstract

Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) inhabiting Puget Sound marine waters have experienced both recent and long-term variability in abundance while supporting robust commercial, tribal, and sport fisheries. In recent years, numerous species-specific status reports have been completed, though formal comparisons among all five species of salmon and steelhead trout are not available. We compared spatial and temporal patterns of abundance, survival, productivity, and body size between hatchery-origin and naturally-produced adult salmon and steelhead trout returning to marine waters of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Stock-specific total run size (of fish at the entrance to Puget Sound) was calculated for pink (O. gorbuscha), chum (O. keta), coho (O. kisutch), sockeye (O. nerka), and Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon for years 1970-2015 by combining estimates of escapement (spawners) with stock-specific estimates of harvest (catch) in Puget Sound marine and fresh waters. In general, trends in abundance varied by species and origin (hatchery vs naturally produced) with increased abundance, survival, and productivity associated with species exhibiting “fry” (vs. “smolt”) life history types. Overall, average weight of salmon and steelhead has decreased significantly since 1970 with the exception of coho salmon. Information presented here will allow fishery managers to evaluate recovery plans and harvest objectives as well as identify trends in abundance, survival, and productivity related to climate and life history expression.

Session Title

Salmon in the Salish Sea

Keywords

Salmon abundance, Puget Sound

Conference Track

SSE11: Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE11-52

Start Date

6-4-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 10:45 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 10:30 AM Apr 6th, 10:45 AM

Pacific Salmon in Puget Sound: abundance, survival and body size (1970-2015)

Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) inhabiting Puget Sound marine waters have experienced both recent and long-term variability in abundance while supporting robust commercial, tribal, and sport fisheries. In recent years, numerous species-specific status reports have been completed, though formal comparisons among all five species of salmon and steelhead trout are not available. We compared spatial and temporal patterns of abundance, survival, productivity, and body size between hatchery-origin and naturally-produced adult salmon and steelhead trout returning to marine waters of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Stock-specific total run size (of fish at the entrance to Puget Sound) was calculated for pink (O. gorbuscha), chum (O. keta), coho (O. kisutch), sockeye (O. nerka), and Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon for years 1970-2015 by combining estimates of escapement (spawners) with stock-specific estimates of harvest (catch) in Puget Sound marine and fresh waters. In general, trends in abundance varied by species and origin (hatchery vs naturally produced) with increased abundance, survival, and productivity associated with species exhibiting “fry” (vs. “smolt”) life history types. Overall, average weight of salmon and steelhead has decreased significantly since 1970 with the exception of coho salmon. Information presented here will allow fishery managers to evaluate recovery plans and harvest objectives as well as identify trends in abundance, survival, and productivity related to climate and life history expression.