Presentation Abstract

Fish, fish habitat and fisheries are deeply important to Lower Fraser First Nations. Since time immemorial, Lower Fraser First Nations have relied on the once abundant fisheries and thriving habitats within their territories to support their way of life, including their spiritual, social, cultural and economic well-being. Yet the Lower Fraser River watershed is also subject to immense anthropogenic pressure due to urban developments, navigation, industrial activities, agriculture, etc. The Fraser River and the hundreds of tributaries, streams, marshes, bogs, swamps, sloughs and lakes within its watershed is at its brink due to escalating cumulative pressures and a re-affirmed legal landscape must inform the foundation for renewed Nation-to-Nation co-management and decision-making. Indigenous inherent rights, and s. 35(1) Aboriginal and Treaty rights, including Aboriginal title, have and will always include the rights and responsibilities of First Nations to govern and manage the fish, fish habitat, and fisheries, and the rivers and coastal waters in their territories. On behalf of past, present and future generations, Lower Fraser First Nations hold and exercise sacred responsibilities to holistically govern and manage the natural ecosystems and the natural balance on which they rely. The presentation will provide an overview of current legal landscape surrounding First Nations reconciliation, observed challenges from a First Nations perspective, as well as actions taken by Lower Fraser First Nations towards protecting the social, food and cultural securities of Lower Fraser First Nations, present and future.

Session Title

The Lower Fraser River: A Wildlife Hotspot on the Brink

Keywords

Fraser, Salmon, First Nations, Indigenous, Salish

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-801

Start Date

6-4-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 11:00 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 10:45 AM Apr 6th, 11:00 AM

Survival of the Lower Fraser and People of the River

Fish, fish habitat and fisheries are deeply important to Lower Fraser First Nations. Since time immemorial, Lower Fraser First Nations have relied on the once abundant fisheries and thriving habitats within their territories to support their way of life, including their spiritual, social, cultural and economic well-being. Yet the Lower Fraser River watershed is also subject to immense anthropogenic pressure due to urban developments, navigation, industrial activities, agriculture, etc. The Fraser River and the hundreds of tributaries, streams, marshes, bogs, swamps, sloughs and lakes within its watershed is at its brink due to escalating cumulative pressures and a re-affirmed legal landscape must inform the foundation for renewed Nation-to-Nation co-management and decision-making. Indigenous inherent rights, and s. 35(1) Aboriginal and Treaty rights, including Aboriginal title, have and will always include the rights and responsibilities of First Nations to govern and manage the fish, fish habitat, and fisheries, and the rivers and coastal waters in their territories. On behalf of past, present and future generations, Lower Fraser First Nations hold and exercise sacred responsibilities to holistically govern and manage the natural ecosystems and the natural balance on which they rely. The presentation will provide an overview of current legal landscape surrounding First Nations reconciliation, observed challenges from a First Nations perspective, as well as actions taken by Lower Fraser First Nations towards protecting the social, food and cultural securities of Lower Fraser First Nations, present and future.