Presentation Abstract

Bull kelp forests are important nearshore habitats for many fish and invertebrates and are an integral part of the “salmon highway” from river to estuary to ocean and back. In recent decades kelp forests have been in serious decline in the Salish Sea and other coastal regions. Research to improve our understanding of causes of the decline and on restoration methods began in the north Salish Sea in 2011 with a kelp out-planting project by Nile Creek Enhancement Society(NCES) at Hornby Island. NCES and Project Watershed began a collaboration in 2015 with work in the K'omoks Estuary and Cape Lazo shoal, becoming part of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project of the Pacific Salmon Foundation. In 2016 academic collaborations with Simon Fraser University and with the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee were initiated to include the study of stress-resiliency of life stages and population genetics of bull kelp. Project Watershed and NCES also participate in a Nearshore Habitat Working Group in BC with members from Citizen's Science, three universities and several non-profit environmental groups.

Session Title

Kelp Distribution and Recovery Strategies in the Salish Sea: Part II

Keywords

Bull kelp, Restoration, Collaboration

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-306

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 11:30 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:15 AM Apr 6th, 11:30 AM

Salish Sea bull kelp restoration research: local, regional and international collaborations

Bull kelp forests are important nearshore habitats for many fish and invertebrates and are an integral part of the “salmon highway” from river to estuary to ocean and back. In recent decades kelp forests have been in serious decline in the Salish Sea and other coastal regions. Research to improve our understanding of causes of the decline and on restoration methods began in the north Salish Sea in 2011 with a kelp out-planting project by Nile Creek Enhancement Society(NCES) at Hornby Island. NCES and Project Watershed began a collaboration in 2015 with work in the K'omoks Estuary and Cape Lazo shoal, becoming part of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project of the Pacific Salmon Foundation. In 2016 academic collaborations with Simon Fraser University and with the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee were initiated to include the study of stress-resiliency of life stages and population genetics of bull kelp. Project Watershed and NCES also participate in a Nearshore Habitat Working Group in BC with members from Citizen's Science, three universities and several non-profit environmental groups.