Event Title

Stormwater retrofits for treating highway runoff: Echo Lake basin

Presentation Abstract

Bioretention technologies are a popular stormwater treatment tool in the Pacific Northwest; however, some local studies have shown certain priority pollutants in stormwater (mainly nutrients and dissolved copper) may increase in concentration after bioretention treatment, particularly when influent concentrations are relatively low. This study evaluates effectiveness of two different bioretention technologies constructed as part of a stormwater retrofit project that treats highway runoff in Shoreline, Washington: 1) mature bioretention planter boxes containing Ecology’s standard compost/sand mix and 2) a commonly-used proprietary media designed to provide phosphorus treatment. Samples were collected and analyzed over two storm seasons to assess reduction in toxicity to water fleas and concentrations of a wide-range of contaminants, including suspended solids, metals, nutrients, petroleum hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The study adds new information on the performance of mature (>3-year old) bioretention installations and important maintenance considerations.

Session Title

Stormwater Characterization and Management Using a Watershed Approach

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-116

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 11:30 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:15 AM Apr 6th, 11:30 AM

Stormwater retrofits for treating highway runoff: Echo Lake basin

Bioretention technologies are a popular stormwater treatment tool in the Pacific Northwest; however, some local studies have shown certain priority pollutants in stormwater (mainly nutrients and dissolved copper) may increase in concentration after bioretention treatment, particularly when influent concentrations are relatively low. This study evaluates effectiveness of two different bioretention technologies constructed as part of a stormwater retrofit project that treats highway runoff in Shoreline, Washington: 1) mature bioretention planter boxes containing Ecology’s standard compost/sand mix and 2) a commonly-used proprietary media designed to provide phosphorus treatment. Samples were collected and analyzed over two storm seasons to assess reduction in toxicity to water fleas and concentrations of a wide-range of contaminants, including suspended solids, metals, nutrients, petroleum hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The study adds new information on the performance of mature (>3-year old) bioretention installations and important maintenance considerations.