Presentation Abstract

The Fraser River Estuary Important Bird and Biodiversity Area consisting of Sturgeon Bank, Roberts Bank, Boundary Bay and upland areas was designated in 2016 as an IBA in Danger by Birdlife International. The designation is based on the myriad of threats across the delta that have developed despite several transboundary and international designations of the region including a Ramsar Wetland of International Significance listing since 1982 and a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site designation since 2004. Despite these listings, declines in coastal waterbirds continue. The Coastal Waterbird Surveys have been running along the BC portion of the Salish Sea since 1999 with over 400 volunteers logging thousands of hours monitoring coastal waterbirds. Of the 57 waterbird species regularly using the Strait of Georgia, trend analysis from 1999-2011 (updated results to be presented) found that 22 of these species were experiencing a decline while three species, Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler and Pigeon Guillemot were increasing. While this species specific trend data has been very useful for transboundary planning initiatives such as the Pacific Birds Habitat Joint Venture, when it comes to addressing localized development threats spatially explicit data is required to aid conservation planning. Bird Studies Canada in collaboration with the Canadian Wildlife Service has recently completed an updated spatially explicit hotspot analysis for 19 guilds covered by the BC Coastal Waterbird Survey. The results of the new hotspot analysis will be presented along with a discussion of some the planning processes where the data is being utilized as an input such as spill response planning and coastal flood adaptation planning. The talk will conclude with some thoughts on the potential of the tools found in the Engagement Organizing literature as means to connect citizen scientists with decision making in order to strengthen the conservation of the Fraser estuary.

Session Title

The Lower Fraser River: A Wildlife Hotspot on the Brink

Keywords

Citizen science, Engagement, Fraser river

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-165

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 11:45 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:30 AM Apr 6th, 11:45 AM

How 19 years of BC coastal waterbird citizen science data is informing conservation planning

The Fraser River Estuary Important Bird and Biodiversity Area consisting of Sturgeon Bank, Roberts Bank, Boundary Bay and upland areas was designated in 2016 as an IBA in Danger by Birdlife International. The designation is based on the myriad of threats across the delta that have developed despite several transboundary and international designations of the region including a Ramsar Wetland of International Significance listing since 1982 and a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site designation since 2004. Despite these listings, declines in coastal waterbirds continue. The Coastal Waterbird Surveys have been running along the BC portion of the Salish Sea since 1999 with over 400 volunteers logging thousands of hours monitoring coastal waterbirds. Of the 57 waterbird species regularly using the Strait of Georgia, trend analysis from 1999-2011 (updated results to be presented) found that 22 of these species were experiencing a decline while three species, Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler and Pigeon Guillemot were increasing. While this species specific trend data has been very useful for transboundary planning initiatives such as the Pacific Birds Habitat Joint Venture, when it comes to addressing localized development threats spatially explicit data is required to aid conservation planning. Bird Studies Canada in collaboration with the Canadian Wildlife Service has recently completed an updated spatially explicit hotspot analysis for 19 guilds covered by the BC Coastal Waterbird Survey. The results of the new hotspot analysis will be presented along with a discussion of some the planning processes where the data is being utilized as an input such as spill response planning and coastal flood adaptation planning. The talk will conclude with some thoughts on the potential of the tools found in the Engagement Organizing literature as means to connect citizen scientists with decision making in order to strengthen the conservation of the Fraser estuary.