Presentation Abstract

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Puget Sound Restoration Fund, and other project partners have outplanted thousands of hatchery-reared pinto abalone in annual cohorts to ten sites in the San Juan Archipelago since 2009. We measured the “success” of each outplant site by the proportion of total juveniles placed that survived to a reproductive size. In winter 2017 surveys we observed a range of successes, from 0% at the worst site to 5.6% at the best. When nearby individuals are included, this success ranges as high as 7.5%. These percentages do not account for the probability of detection for a given abalone, which available information from tagged abalone suggests is between 20 – 40%. They also do not account for emigration from the sites, which has not been quantified. I’ll discuss these results, their implications for on-site reproduction, and their incorporation into an integrated population model describing the survival and growth of outplanted juveniles. I’ll also discuss the future of pinto abalone recovery, including our new strategy to “repeal and replace” low performing sites, optimize outplant efficiency, and scale-up restoration efforts to achieve population-wide recovery.

Session Title

Species and Habitats of Emerging Concern

Keywords

Abalone, Pinto abalone, Haliotis, Restoration

Conference Track

SSE11: Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE11-486

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 12:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:45 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Survival of hatchery-origin juvenile pinto abalone (Haliotis kamtschatkana) outplanted to restoration sites in the San Juan Islands

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Puget Sound Restoration Fund, and other project partners have outplanted thousands of hatchery-reared pinto abalone in annual cohorts to ten sites in the San Juan Archipelago since 2009. We measured the “success” of each outplant site by the proportion of total juveniles placed that survived to a reproductive size. In winter 2017 surveys we observed a range of successes, from 0% at the worst site to 5.6% at the best. When nearby individuals are included, this success ranges as high as 7.5%. These percentages do not account for the probability of detection for a given abalone, which available information from tagged abalone suggests is between 20 – 40%. They also do not account for emigration from the sites, which has not been quantified. I’ll discuss these results, their implications for on-site reproduction, and their incorporation into an integrated population model describing the survival and growth of outplanted juveniles. I’ll also discuss the future of pinto abalone recovery, including our new strategy to “repeal and replace” low performing sites, optimize outplant efficiency, and scale-up restoration efforts to achieve population-wide recovery.