Presentation Abstract

Ever wonder what happens to all those data being collected? In Island County, we are fortunate to be the focus of a plethora of data collection efforts. We have comprehensive nearshore assessments that describe where our habitats are and how those habitats are built. We have habitat assessments that are a collaborative effort between citizen science groups and state agencies. We have long-term status and trends data sets on intertidal habitats and presence for a few specific species. We have a high resolution shoreline armor dataset and we have a predictive probability model for coastal flood risk. But what do we do with all of these data? What kind of information can be extrapolated from all this hard work? Most importantly, how is it helping us make a difference to our nearshore management? Island County’s Department of Natural Resources is working with our partners and committees to utilize this information to help guide and inform their decisions. We are finding that there are two broad categories of data sets – those that are most useful in informing decisions and those that are most useful in communication and outreach. We will discuss which sets fall into which category, and how we are working to evolve our datasets into useful next steps.

Session Title

Coordinating Regionally Accepted Nearshore Geospatial Data

Keywords

Nearshore, Data, Policy, Implementation

Conference Track

SSE15: Data and Information Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE15-499

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 12:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:45 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

From data to decisions: Navigating the “So What?” and “What’s Next?” conversation around nearshore data

Ever wonder what happens to all those data being collected? In Island County, we are fortunate to be the focus of a plethora of data collection efforts. We have comprehensive nearshore assessments that describe where our habitats are and how those habitats are built. We have habitat assessments that are a collaborative effort between citizen science groups and state agencies. We have long-term status and trends data sets on intertidal habitats and presence for a few specific species. We have a high resolution shoreline armor dataset and we have a predictive probability model for coastal flood risk. But what do we do with all of these data? What kind of information can be extrapolated from all this hard work? Most importantly, how is it helping us make a difference to our nearshore management? Island County’s Department of Natural Resources is working with our partners and committees to utilize this information to help guide and inform their decisions. We are finding that there are two broad categories of data sets – those that are most useful in informing decisions and those that are most useful in communication and outreach. We will discuss which sets fall into which category, and how we are working to evolve our datasets into useful next steps.