Event Title

Restoration of ecosystem processes in Puget Sound nearshore habitats: what we have lost, where we are going, and how we are learning along the way

Presentation Abstract

The Puget Sound nearshore is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that has changed dramatically in the last 150 years and faces a myriad of ongoing anthropogenic influences. Conducting restoration in nearshore habitats is a vital component of Puget Sound ecosystem recovery, yet this cannot be done effectively without applying adaptive and strategic knowledge at both local and regional scales. Nearshore habitats are dynamically influenced by both riverine and marine abiotic and biotic forces such that it can be challenging to disentangle the individual and cumulative effects of restoration projects across environmental gradients acting at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Despite the challenges in accomplishing such efforts, integrating data collection and analysis across local and landscape-level scales is an important aspect of both understanding the relationship between individual restoration efforts and their surrounding ecosystems and in planning and implementing new restoration projects. The Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) seeks to strategically restore and protect nearshore processes in Puget Sound through understanding both the historic and current condition of the landscape and through supporting research to inform restoration.

Session Title

Strategic Recovery Part I: Managing Recovery at Different Scales

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-594

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 12:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:45 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Restoration of ecosystem processes in Puget Sound nearshore habitats: what we have lost, where we are going, and how we are learning along the way

The Puget Sound nearshore is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that has changed dramatically in the last 150 years and faces a myriad of ongoing anthropogenic influences. Conducting restoration in nearshore habitats is a vital component of Puget Sound ecosystem recovery, yet this cannot be done effectively without applying adaptive and strategic knowledge at both local and regional scales. Nearshore habitats are dynamically influenced by both riverine and marine abiotic and biotic forces such that it can be challenging to disentangle the individual and cumulative effects of restoration projects across environmental gradients acting at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Despite the challenges in accomplishing such efforts, integrating data collection and analysis across local and landscape-level scales is an important aspect of both understanding the relationship between individual restoration efforts and their surrounding ecosystems and in planning and implementing new restoration projects. The Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) seeks to strategically restore and protect nearshore processes in Puget Sound through understanding both the historic and current condition of the landscape and through supporting research to inform restoration.