Event Title

Suggestions for rethinking governance in the Fraser estuary

Presentation Abstract

The Fraser estuary today has been hard hit by the past 150+ years of European colonization and settlement. It now faces a changing climate. Looking forward towards ecosystem recovery, and reconciliation, we should carefully consider the governance arrangements that got us to this point. Existing governance is fragmented and for the most part not linked to ecosystem management. Without necessarily intending to, decisionmaking has supported activities that resulted in the loss of 80% of the original wetlands, and has had harsh impacts for salmon and other species that previously were well and sustainably managed by Coast Salish peoples for millennia. There is little reason to hope that increased funding or political attention will improve the present situation without rethinking the existing governance arrangements. We consider key aspects of governance in light of failures in the estuary, and present ideas about how we can move towards arrangements that will support both ecosystem recovery and reconciliation. This research draws on the work that has been carried out to identify management strategies for the University of British Columbia/University of Victoria project, Prioritizing Threat Management Strategies to Ensure Long-term Resilience of the Fraser Estuary, as well as comparative legal research carried out through an Environmental Law Workshop at the Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia.

Session Title

The Lower Fraser River: A Wildlife Hotspot on the Brink

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-643

Start Date

6-4-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

6-4-2018 12:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 11:45 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Suggestions for rethinking governance in the Fraser estuary

The Fraser estuary today has been hard hit by the past 150+ years of European colonization and settlement. It now faces a changing climate. Looking forward towards ecosystem recovery, and reconciliation, we should carefully consider the governance arrangements that got us to this point. Existing governance is fragmented and for the most part not linked to ecosystem management. Without necessarily intending to, decisionmaking has supported activities that resulted in the loss of 80% of the original wetlands, and has had harsh impacts for salmon and other species that previously were well and sustainably managed by Coast Salish peoples for millennia. There is little reason to hope that increased funding or political attention will improve the present situation without rethinking the existing governance arrangements. We consider key aspects of governance in light of failures in the estuary, and present ideas about how we can move towards arrangements that will support both ecosystem recovery and reconciliation. This research draws on the work that has been carried out to identify management strategies for the University of British Columbia/University of Victoria project, Prioritizing Threat Management Strategies to Ensure Long-term Resilience of the Fraser Estuary, as well as comparative legal research carried out through an Environmental Law Workshop at the Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia.