Event Title

Phytoplankton monitoring through the SoundToxins partnership improves shellfish management and safety for the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe

Presentation Abstract

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe has monitored phytoplankton in Sequim Bay, WA as part of the SoundToxins program since 2008 to better understand the ecology of Sequim Bay and the growing environment of the Tribe’s culturally and economically important shellfish resources. The Tribe has been successful in using phytoplankton monitoring data to better inform shellfish biotoxin sampling efforts focused on protecting Tribal harvesters from consuming shellfish with unsafe levels of paralytic, diarrhetic and amnesiac shellfish toxins. With a focus on toxin-producing species, weekly phytoplankton monitoring activities have played a crucial role in establishing suitable biotoxin sampling locations and frequency to ensure the safety of the Tribe’s shellfish resources and minimize economic losses. It has also allowed the Tribe to document and track emerging harmful algal species (e.g., Dinophysis spp.) in Sequim Bay. Further, consistent monitoring has provided the Tribe with a greater understanding of unusual fish and shellfish mortality events linked to harmful phytoplankton, such as adult summer chum salmon mortality associated with a Heterosigma akashiwo bloom in 2014. The Tribe’s experience demonstrates the value of phytoplankton monitoring within the broader framework of managing fisheries resources.

Session Title

Harmful Phytoplankton in the Salish Sea: Part I

Conference Track

SSE5: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, and Research

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE5-219

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:45 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 2:45 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Phytoplankton monitoring through the SoundToxins partnership improves shellfish management and safety for the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe has monitored phytoplankton in Sequim Bay, WA as part of the SoundToxins program since 2008 to better understand the ecology of Sequim Bay and the growing environment of the Tribe’s culturally and economically important shellfish resources. The Tribe has been successful in using phytoplankton monitoring data to better inform shellfish biotoxin sampling efforts focused on protecting Tribal harvesters from consuming shellfish with unsafe levels of paralytic, diarrhetic and amnesiac shellfish toxins. With a focus on toxin-producing species, weekly phytoplankton monitoring activities have played a crucial role in establishing suitable biotoxin sampling locations and frequency to ensure the safety of the Tribe’s shellfish resources and minimize economic losses. It has also allowed the Tribe to document and track emerging harmful algal species (e.g., Dinophysis spp.) in Sequim Bay. Further, consistent monitoring has provided the Tribe with a greater understanding of unusual fish and shellfish mortality events linked to harmful phytoplankton, such as adult summer chum salmon mortality associated with a Heterosigma akashiwo bloom in 2014. The Tribe’s experience demonstrates the value of phytoplankton monitoring within the broader framework of managing fisheries resources.