Event Title

Cardiac injury and reduced growth in Pacific herring exposed to urban stormwater runoff

Presentation Abstract

Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) are a keystone species that spawn adhesive eggs on intertidal and shallow subtidal substrates. This nearshore spawning places sensitive life history stages (embryos and larvae) in close proximity to land-based non-point source pollution such as urban stormwater runoff. Untreated urban runoff is chemically complex and highly toxic to aquatic life, including freshwater fish and invertebrates. However, very little is known about the impacts of urban runoff on nearshore marine fish. To examine the impacts of stormwater runoff on forage fish embryonic development, we exposed herring embryos to 0, 12, 25, or 50% stormwater runoff beginning just prior to the onset of a visible heartbeat (5 dpf) through hatching (11 dpf). Preliminary results indicate that stormwater exposures caused significant reductions in larval length and greater egg yolk area, consistent with a failure to mobilize embryonic energy stores (yolk). In addition, herring exposed to stormwater runoff exhibited cardiac injury including both functional (e.g., bradycardia, contractility) and morphological (e.g., increased atrium area) heart defects. The observed effects are consistent with the known cardiotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to fish embryos and could result in delayed adverse outcomes such as reduced cardiorespiratory fitness and subsequent mortality.

Session Title

Advances in the Understanding of Drivers of Change and Potential Conservation Actions for Pacific Herring in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

SSE11: Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE11-583

Start Date

6-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

6-4-2018 2:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 2:00 PM Apr 6th, 2:15 PM

Cardiac injury and reduced growth in Pacific herring exposed to urban stormwater runoff

Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) are a keystone species that spawn adhesive eggs on intertidal and shallow subtidal substrates. This nearshore spawning places sensitive life history stages (embryos and larvae) in close proximity to land-based non-point source pollution such as urban stormwater runoff. Untreated urban runoff is chemically complex and highly toxic to aquatic life, including freshwater fish and invertebrates. However, very little is known about the impacts of urban runoff on nearshore marine fish. To examine the impacts of stormwater runoff on forage fish embryonic development, we exposed herring embryos to 0, 12, 25, or 50% stormwater runoff beginning just prior to the onset of a visible heartbeat (5 dpf) through hatching (11 dpf). Preliminary results indicate that stormwater exposures caused significant reductions in larval length and greater egg yolk area, consistent with a failure to mobilize embryonic energy stores (yolk). In addition, herring exposed to stormwater runoff exhibited cardiac injury including both functional (e.g., bradycardia, contractility) and morphological (e.g., increased atrium area) heart defects. The observed effects are consistent with the known cardiotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to fish embryos and could result in delayed adverse outcomes such as reduced cardiorespiratory fitness and subsequent mortality.