Presentation Abstract

Nearshore monitoring of benthic habitats and the coastal environment following the Elwha River Restoration project has engaged students and citizens with coastal science and management issues. In the post-dam-removal period, the lessons learned will continue to be disseminated via a UW undergraduate course and an interactive digital map, both designed to engage students and communities in restoration science. The research-focused course developed at the UW Friday Harbor Labs has allowed us to engage diverse undergraduate students (and graduate teaching assistants) in the research process. The course integrates interdisciplinary lectures and workshops on data analysis and laboratory methods, with the research process; from proposal to oceanographic data collection to analysis to publication. The course provides opportunities for student creativity and leadership. Outcome tracking indicates that these undergraduate (and post-bac) students are generally attending graduate school at a high rate, and launching careers in education, coastal management, and other STEM fields. To engage a broader segment of the community and to support decision-making about large-scale coastal restoration projects, we have developed an interactive digital map that will be available on-line, and will also be piloted as a physical interpretive display at the Feiro Marine Life Center in Port Angeles, WA. The interactive digital map is designed to effectively tell the story of the Elwha restoration in the coastal environment through the compilation and display of multiple data sets, some of which have never before been publicly available. Ultimately, the result of long-term monitoring of the Elwha nearshore system will provide a better understanding of the effects of restoration activities, such as dam removal on benthic habitats, and this knowledge will be passed to future managers and citizens through educational and outreach activities that captivate and inspire a broad audience.

Session Title

Communication Tools to Accelerate Success

Keywords

Elwha river, Education, Outreach

Conference Track

SSE6: Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE6-381

Start Date

6-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

6-4-2018 2:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 6th, 2:15 PM Apr 6th, 2:30 PM

Experiential education and outreach based on nearshore monitoring of the Elwha River restoration project

Nearshore monitoring of benthic habitats and the coastal environment following the Elwha River Restoration project has engaged students and citizens with coastal science and management issues. In the post-dam-removal period, the lessons learned will continue to be disseminated via a UW undergraduate course and an interactive digital map, both designed to engage students and communities in restoration science. The research-focused course developed at the UW Friday Harbor Labs has allowed us to engage diverse undergraduate students (and graduate teaching assistants) in the research process. The course integrates interdisciplinary lectures and workshops on data analysis and laboratory methods, with the research process; from proposal to oceanographic data collection to analysis to publication. The course provides opportunities for student creativity and leadership. Outcome tracking indicates that these undergraduate (and post-bac) students are generally attending graduate school at a high rate, and launching careers in education, coastal management, and other STEM fields. To engage a broader segment of the community and to support decision-making about large-scale coastal restoration projects, we have developed an interactive digital map that will be available on-line, and will also be piloted as a physical interpretive display at the Feiro Marine Life Center in Port Angeles, WA. The interactive digital map is designed to effectively tell the story of the Elwha restoration in the coastal environment through the compilation and display of multiple data sets, some of which have never before been publicly available. Ultimately, the result of long-term monitoring of the Elwha nearshore system will provide a better understanding of the effects of restoration activities, such as dam removal on benthic habitats, and this knowledge will be passed to future managers and citizens through educational and outreach activities that captivate and inspire a broad audience.