Presentation Abstract

Hard armor structures, including bulkheads, seawalls, soldier piles, and other structures are present at 29% of Washington shores of the Salish Sea, as documented in mapping conducted by CGS for the ESRP Beach Strategies project . Hard armor adversely affects nearshore ecosystems by disrupting natural processes of sediment input and transport, reducing resiliency of down-drift coastal areas to impacts of sea level rise, and impairing essential forage fish spawning and other habitats. Soft shore protection, also referred to as sustainable shorelines or nature based solutions, allows for slowing erosion while maintaining natural processes. Soft sure protection design and implementation have received increasing attention and acceptance in the Salish Sea in recent decades. This has stemmed from increasing documentation of negative impacts of hard armor, dramatically stricter regulations, the increasing rigor applied to the design process, and expanded information and outreach. Lessons learned on design and implementation will be presented based on continuously advancing soft shore protection approaches over the past 20 years and the design and implementation of more than 120 of these projects throughout Puget Sound and in the central Salish Sea. Project approaches successfully applied to both residential and larger reaches of shore will be highlighted, organized around different short types (barrier beaches, bluffs, artificial shores), relative wave energy, and by property extent. Principles featured in the 2014 Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines will be distilled, along with data and examples not included in the MSDG. Soft shore protection has been shown to work in all wave energy environments of the Puget Sound region, depending on other factors such as shore orientation, project length, backshore with, and other site characteristics. Case studies will be provided to illustrate points, and site selection implementation pointers will be included as lessons learned. Additional references will be provided for further information.

Session Title

Challenges and Solutions for Shoreline Armor Removal and Design of Soft Shore Protection: Part II

Keywords

Beach, Restoration, Soft shore, Armor removal

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-321

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Soft shore protection: lessons learned from 20 years of project design and implementation

Hard armor structures, including bulkheads, seawalls, soldier piles, and other structures are present at 29% of Washington shores of the Salish Sea, as documented in mapping conducted by CGS for the ESRP Beach Strategies project . Hard armor adversely affects nearshore ecosystems by disrupting natural processes of sediment input and transport, reducing resiliency of down-drift coastal areas to impacts of sea level rise, and impairing essential forage fish spawning and other habitats. Soft shore protection, also referred to as sustainable shorelines or nature based solutions, allows for slowing erosion while maintaining natural processes. Soft sure protection design and implementation have received increasing attention and acceptance in the Salish Sea in recent decades. This has stemmed from increasing documentation of negative impacts of hard armor, dramatically stricter regulations, the increasing rigor applied to the design process, and expanded information and outreach. Lessons learned on design and implementation will be presented based on continuously advancing soft shore protection approaches over the past 20 years and the design and implementation of more than 120 of these projects throughout Puget Sound and in the central Salish Sea. Project approaches successfully applied to both residential and larger reaches of shore will be highlighted, organized around different short types (barrier beaches, bluffs, artificial shores), relative wave energy, and by property extent. Principles featured in the 2014 Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines will be distilled, along with data and examples not included in the MSDG. Soft shore protection has been shown to work in all wave energy environments of the Puget Sound region, depending on other factors such as shore orientation, project length, backshore with, and other site characteristics. Case studies will be provided to illustrate points, and site selection implementation pointers will be included as lessons learned. Additional references will be provided for further information.