Presentation Abstract

Stormwater management has evolved from simple flood reduction to conventional water quality treatment to flow-control AND water-quality to the current low impact development (LID) or Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) approach. Along the way, we have utilized stormwater best management practices (BMP's) at various scales, from neighborhood ponds to large regional facilities, to the small distributed BMP's that characterize the LID/GSI approach. Based on our experience in Kitsap County, we believe that a blending of approaches, both conventional and green, as well as working at multiple scales is necessary to effectively manage the impacts of our urbanizing landscape. Our stormwater retrofit program works at multiple scales. From parcel-scale rain garden installations, to the upgrade and greening of neighborhood stormwater ponds and swales, to regional stormwater treatment facility capital projects, and urban stream floodplain restoration projects, we believe it is necessary to work at multiple scales within a watershed to affect long-term improvements. In addition, we believe that it is no longer acceptable to construct stormwater treatment facilities that have the sole purpose of managing urban runoff. To foster better community acceptance and educate the public on stormwater issues, these facilities must have multiple functions and provide additional benefits to communities and the citizens who are ultimately paying for them. We have constructed or retrofit several of these multi-functional/benefit facilities in Kitsap County at various scales. This includes neighborhood ponds and larger regional facilities serving over 100 acres. In addition to providing high quality stormwater treatment, these "stormwater parks" provide community gathering places for farmers markets and local events, as well as amenities such as walking trails, play areas, wildlife habitat, and other recreational opportunities. We think the use of Green Stormwater Solutions (GSS) at multiple scales combined with the incorporation of multiple community benefits is the path forward to managing stormwater in our urbanizing watersheds and restoring our part of Puget Sound.

Session Title

The Performance of Low Impact Development Applied Across Land Use Scales Using Flow Control, Water Quality and Biological Metrics

Keywords

Stormwater management, LID, Stormwater

Conference Track

SSE12: Land-Use, Growth, and Development

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE12-210

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Regional approaches using green stormwater solutions: multi-benefit/functional stormwater parks in Kitsap County

Stormwater management has evolved from simple flood reduction to conventional water quality treatment to flow-control AND water-quality to the current low impact development (LID) or Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) approach. Along the way, we have utilized stormwater best management practices (BMP's) at various scales, from neighborhood ponds to large regional facilities, to the small distributed BMP's that characterize the LID/GSI approach. Based on our experience in Kitsap County, we believe that a blending of approaches, both conventional and green, as well as working at multiple scales is necessary to effectively manage the impacts of our urbanizing landscape. Our stormwater retrofit program works at multiple scales. From parcel-scale rain garden installations, to the upgrade and greening of neighborhood stormwater ponds and swales, to regional stormwater treatment facility capital projects, and urban stream floodplain restoration projects, we believe it is necessary to work at multiple scales within a watershed to affect long-term improvements. In addition, we believe that it is no longer acceptable to construct stormwater treatment facilities that have the sole purpose of managing urban runoff. To foster better community acceptance and educate the public on stormwater issues, these facilities must have multiple functions and provide additional benefits to communities and the citizens who are ultimately paying for them. We have constructed or retrofit several of these multi-functional/benefit facilities in Kitsap County at various scales. This includes neighborhood ponds and larger regional facilities serving over 100 acres. In addition to providing high quality stormwater treatment, these "stormwater parks" provide community gathering places for farmers markets and local events, as well as amenities such as walking trails, play areas, wildlife habitat, and other recreational opportunities. We think the use of Green Stormwater Solutions (GSS) at multiple scales combined with the incorporation of multiple community benefits is the path forward to managing stormwater in our urbanizing watersheds and restoring our part of Puget Sound.