Event Title

Structure-from-motion: uses in long-term shoreline monitoring

Presentation Abstract

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is tasked with the protection of State priority habitat and species through regulation of marine shoreline activities. To inform the development of best protections and mitigations, the WDFW Habitat Science Program has been monitoring how shoreline restoration activities throughout Puget Sound influence the topography and function of Washington’s nearshore environments. To support this effort, we explored the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM), a photogrammetry technique that uses digital imagery with modeling software to create high-resolution 3-D models that enable real-world topographic mapping. At 13 shoreline armor removal sites throughout Puget Sound, the WDFW nearshore monitoring team used SfM to model restoration project sites to characterize the nearshore environment. We collected photos on-site using a compact camera either hand-held or fixed to an extendable pole, and used Trimble RTK GPS to collect ground control points. In phase one of our study, we completed surveys at project sites before restoration activities to establish baseline conditions, and again after restoration efforts to assess near-term responses of the physical beach environment. For phase two, WDFW will continue monitoring efforts to better understand long-term beach responses and inform future planning and development of shoreline restoration activities in these dynamic nearshore environments. While our monitoring project is on-going, we have identified and successfully implemented SfM to model localized nearshore environments. This technique uses simpler and more cost-effective equipment that in turn provides accurate high-resolution topographic data to quantify shoreline responses, and provide a foundation to continue long-term monitoring across a diversity of shoreline restoration projects. We plan to continue exploring the merits of SfM in a suite of landscape research and shoreline management, aim to advance efficiencies in field data collection and model processing, and continue to develop collaboration within and outside the department to expand SfM survey efforts.

Session Title

Structure from Motion and Drone Aerial Imagery for Coastal Restoration and Management

Conference Track

SSE15: Data and Information Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE15-422

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Structure-from-motion: uses in long-term shoreline monitoring

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is tasked with the protection of State priority habitat and species through regulation of marine shoreline activities. To inform the development of best protections and mitigations, the WDFW Habitat Science Program has been monitoring how shoreline restoration activities throughout Puget Sound influence the topography and function of Washington’s nearshore environments. To support this effort, we explored the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM), a photogrammetry technique that uses digital imagery with modeling software to create high-resolution 3-D models that enable real-world topographic mapping. At 13 shoreline armor removal sites throughout Puget Sound, the WDFW nearshore monitoring team used SfM to model restoration project sites to characterize the nearshore environment. We collected photos on-site using a compact camera either hand-held or fixed to an extendable pole, and used Trimble RTK GPS to collect ground control points. In phase one of our study, we completed surveys at project sites before restoration activities to establish baseline conditions, and again after restoration efforts to assess near-term responses of the physical beach environment. For phase two, WDFW will continue monitoring efforts to better understand long-term beach responses and inform future planning and development of shoreline restoration activities in these dynamic nearshore environments. While our monitoring project is on-going, we have identified and successfully implemented SfM to model localized nearshore environments. This technique uses simpler and more cost-effective equipment that in turn provides accurate high-resolution topographic data to quantify shoreline responses, and provide a foundation to continue long-term monitoring across a diversity of shoreline restoration projects. We plan to continue exploring the merits of SfM in a suite of landscape research and shoreline management, aim to advance efficiencies in field data collection and model processing, and continue to develop collaboration within and outside the department to expand SfM survey efforts.