Presentation Abstract

Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of man-made chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products, such as water-, stain-, and oil-repelling coatings, and fire-fighting foams. In 2008, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) found low levels, but widespread occurrence, of PFASs in Washington State freshwater systems. To determine whether the concentrations and/or compound make up has changed following shifts in manufacturing, Ecology conducted a follow-up study in 2016 to characterize current environmental levels of PFAS contaminants. Across the state, Ecology collected surface water from 15 waterbodies, effluent from 5 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), freshwater fish from 11 sites, and osprey eggs from 3 sites for analysis of a suite of PFAS compounds. PFAS concentrations were highest in surface water collected from waterbodies impacted by WWTP effluent in eastern Washington and urban lakes located within the Salish Sea watershed (Angle Lake, Meridian Lake, and Lake Washington). Surface water samples from the two waterbody types (WWTP-impacted waterbodies and urban lakes) displayed distinct compound profiles, with the urban lakes containing higher relative percent contributions of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Fillet and liver tissue from freshwater fish species collected from the urban lakes were also highest in total PFAS concentrations statewide and PFOS was the dominant compound in biota samples. PFASs were generally not detected in surface water of rivers draining to the Salish Sea (Nooksack River, Puyallup River, and Snohomish River).

Session Title

Persistent Organic Pollutants and PAHs in Freshwater & Marine Fish

Keywords

PFAS, Perfluoroalkyl substances, Toxics, Freshwater fish

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-438

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Survey of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Washington State rivers and lakes

Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of man-made chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products, such as water-, stain-, and oil-repelling coatings, and fire-fighting foams. In 2008, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) found low levels, but widespread occurrence, of PFASs in Washington State freshwater systems. To determine whether the concentrations and/or compound make up has changed following shifts in manufacturing, Ecology conducted a follow-up study in 2016 to characterize current environmental levels of PFAS contaminants. Across the state, Ecology collected surface water from 15 waterbodies, effluent from 5 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), freshwater fish from 11 sites, and osprey eggs from 3 sites for analysis of a suite of PFAS compounds. PFAS concentrations were highest in surface water collected from waterbodies impacted by WWTP effluent in eastern Washington and urban lakes located within the Salish Sea watershed (Angle Lake, Meridian Lake, and Lake Washington). Surface water samples from the two waterbody types (WWTP-impacted waterbodies and urban lakes) displayed distinct compound profiles, with the urban lakes containing higher relative percent contributions of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Fillet and liver tissue from freshwater fish species collected from the urban lakes were also highest in total PFAS concentrations statewide and PFOS was the dominant compound in biota samples. PFASs were generally not detected in surface water of rivers draining to the Salish Sea (Nooksack River, Puyallup River, and Snohomish River).