Presentation Abstract

The Thurston Regional Planning Council’s (TRPC) Thurston Climate Adaptation Plan is an example of an integrative approach that translates science to policy, as well as incorporates accessible decision-support tools and diverse stakeholder input, to develop strategies (actions) that can be applied across Salish Sea watersheds. TRPC used a National Estuary Program grant during 2016 and 2017 to develop the plan, which recommends adaptation actions to help tribes, municipalities, businesses, nonprofits, and other stakeholders prepare for and adjust to climate change impacts. The project area includes the Puget Sound-draining Nisqually, Deschutes, and Kennedy-Goldsborough watersheds. However, the plan's science-informed actions may be applied effectively across all of Thurston County and the broader Salish Sea region. The plan’s vulnerability assessment incorporates University of Washington Climate Impacts Group data and analysis, which are based on climate modeling that utilizes emissions scenarios used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. TRPC used the data and GIS to create maps that show historical and projected changes in environmental indicators (e.g., precipitation, streamflow, runoff, snowpack, etc.) across the South Puget Sound watersheds. The vulnerability assessment also describes how human health and welfare, as well as highways, municipal water systems, estuaries, and other built and natural “assets” within the project area are vulnerable to the collective impacts of natural hazards (e.g., wildfires, landslides, floods) and human-caused stressors (e.g., water pollution) exacerbated by climate change. The project team and its Stakeholder Advisory Committee — composed of public- and private-sector representatives (cities, tribes, utilities, residents, etc.) — used a U.S. EPA methodology to evaluate how 85 risks identified in the vulnerability assessment affect the region’s ability to achieve the 12 project goals. The project team and committee then incorporated significant public input to develop and prioritize 91 adaptation actions that respond to climate risks of highest likelihood and consequence of occurrence.

Session Title

Achieving an Integrated Watershed Approach for Freshwater Ecosystems in the Salish Sea

Keywords

Climate modeling, Collaborative planning, Salish Sea watersheds, Climate adaptation

Conference Track

SSE4: Ecosystem Management, Policy, and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE4-70

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Using climate modeling and collaborative planning to develop adaptation actions across Salish Sea watersheds

The Thurston Regional Planning Council’s (TRPC) Thurston Climate Adaptation Plan is an example of an integrative approach that translates science to policy, as well as incorporates accessible decision-support tools and diverse stakeholder input, to develop strategies (actions) that can be applied across Salish Sea watersheds. TRPC used a National Estuary Program grant during 2016 and 2017 to develop the plan, which recommends adaptation actions to help tribes, municipalities, businesses, nonprofits, and other stakeholders prepare for and adjust to climate change impacts. The project area includes the Puget Sound-draining Nisqually, Deschutes, and Kennedy-Goldsborough watersheds. However, the plan's science-informed actions may be applied effectively across all of Thurston County and the broader Salish Sea region. The plan’s vulnerability assessment incorporates University of Washington Climate Impacts Group data and analysis, which are based on climate modeling that utilizes emissions scenarios used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. TRPC used the data and GIS to create maps that show historical and projected changes in environmental indicators (e.g., precipitation, streamflow, runoff, snowpack, etc.) across the South Puget Sound watersheds. The vulnerability assessment also describes how human health and welfare, as well as highways, municipal water systems, estuaries, and other built and natural “assets” within the project area are vulnerable to the collective impacts of natural hazards (e.g., wildfires, landslides, floods) and human-caused stressors (e.g., water pollution) exacerbated by climate change. The project team and its Stakeholder Advisory Committee — composed of public- and private-sector representatives (cities, tribes, utilities, residents, etc.) — used a U.S. EPA methodology to evaluate how 85 risks identified in the vulnerability assessment affect the region’s ability to achieve the 12 project goals. The project team and committee then incorporated significant public input to develop and prioritize 91 adaptation actions that respond to climate risks of highest likelihood and consequence of occurrence.