Event Title

Management options that address cumulative effects and aid recovery of SRKW

Presentation Abstract

A Population Viability Analysis published in 2017 (Lacy et al.) found that prey limitation was the most important factor affecting population growth in Southern Resident killer whales, but reduced foraging efficiency due to vessel traffic and contaminant burden all inhibit recovery. However, to meet recovery targets through prey management alone, Chinook abundance would have to be sustained near the highest levels since the 1970s. Reducing noise and disturbance by 50% combined with increasing Chinook by 15% would allow the population to rebuild. This presentation examines immediate and long term management options that include domestic and international fisheries management, restricting vessel traffic from key foraging areas, and other initiatives designed to increase accessibility, availability and abundance of Chinook salmon within SRKW critical habitat in an effort to further recovery of this endangered population.

Session Title

Transboundary Actions to Address Threats to Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW)

Conference Track

SSE9: Transboundary Management and Policy

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE9-950

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:45 PM

Management options that address cumulative effects and aid recovery of SRKW

A Population Viability Analysis published in 2017 (Lacy et al.) found that prey limitation was the most important factor affecting population growth in Southern Resident killer whales, but reduced foraging efficiency due to vessel traffic and contaminant burden all inhibit recovery. However, to meet recovery targets through prey management alone, Chinook abundance would have to be sustained near the highest levels since the 1970s. Reducing noise and disturbance by 50% combined with increasing Chinook by 15% would allow the population to rebuild. This presentation examines immediate and long term management options that include domestic and international fisheries management, restricting vessel traffic from key foraging areas, and other initiatives designed to increase accessibility, availability and abundance of Chinook salmon within SRKW critical habitat in an effort to further recovery of this endangered population.