Event Title

Indigenizing climate change health impact assessments and action plans: the Swinomish health template

Presentation Abstract

Increasingly over the past decade, local and regional governments have begun developing climate change impact assessments and action plans for planning and decision-making purposes. Indigenous Nations are leading this work with the overall goal to protect the health and wellbeing of their members, lands, waters, and air. Evaluating potential human health effects is an integral part of these climate change plans, yet the majority of the plans are unable to employ the health values and priorities of Indigenous communities because there are no established metrics with which to do so. We will present our methods and findings from a recently completed project assessing community health implications and priorities in relation to projected changes in the habitats of salmon, crabs and clams due to sea level rise and storm surge on the Swinomish Reservation. We will discuss how Swinomish define health—based on the concept of resilience—and provide a template for other Indigenous communities to tailor and adapt for their own needs in evaluating community health impacts and priorities moving forward. This work demonstrates the importance of working from the ground up by involving the community in the assessment and planning processes and ensuring that the health information—what health means, what may be effected and how, and priorities, originate from the community members themselves.

Session Title

Panel: Towards Resilience Through a Socio-Ecological Paradigm

Conference Track

SSE8: Policy, Management, and Regulations

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE8-584

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 3:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Indigenizing climate change health impact assessments and action plans: the Swinomish health template

Increasingly over the past decade, local and regional governments have begun developing climate change impact assessments and action plans for planning and decision-making purposes. Indigenous Nations are leading this work with the overall goal to protect the health and wellbeing of their members, lands, waters, and air. Evaluating potential human health effects is an integral part of these climate change plans, yet the majority of the plans are unable to employ the health values and priorities of Indigenous communities because there are no established metrics with which to do so. We will present our methods and findings from a recently completed project assessing community health implications and priorities in relation to projected changes in the habitats of salmon, crabs and clams due to sea level rise and storm surge on the Swinomish Reservation. We will discuss how Swinomish define health—based on the concept of resilience—and provide a template for other Indigenous communities to tailor and adapt for their own needs in evaluating community health impacts and priorities moving forward. This work demonstrates the importance of working from the ground up by involving the community in the assessment and planning processes and ensuring that the health information—what health means, what may be effected and how, and priorities, originate from the community members themselves.