Presentation Abstract

Recent advances in several broadly allied scientific disciplines have shown that green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) can to some extent restore the natural pathways that stormwater takes from landscape to stream. Permeable pavements are one of several GSI techniques that are commonly used across the country to mitigate the effects of stormwater on downstream receiving waters. In the State of Washington, the use of GSI is mandated for any new or retrofit construction project that meets certain criteria. The talk will focus on performance studies of a 9-cell replicated asphalt pavement test facility that is installed at the Washington State University Puyallup Research and Extension Center Campus, Puyallup, WA. The asphalt test facility has 9 lined cells - 3 cells are constructed with conventional asphalt and 6 with porous asphalt. Runoff from the impervious cells acted as a control and were compared to runoff from the pervious cells. All water applied to the surface and that which infiltrated through the sub-base aggregate was monitored and collected at the outflow. Artificial and natural storm events were used to test both hydrologic and biogeochemical properties of the two systems. Pollutants evaluated were suspended sediments, metals, nutrients, and hydrocarbons. Results from this work show that porous asphalt pavements are able to infiltrate as much as 99.5% of incident rainfall. Additionally, preliminary results suggest that porous asphalt pavement systems are capable of considerable treatment of several key stormwater pollutants. This work will be presented in full at the conference.

Session Title

The Performance of Low Impact Development Applied Across Land Use Scales Using Flow Control, Water Quality and Biological Metrics

Keywords

Porous asphalt pavements, Stormwater, Stormwater quantity and quality mitigation

Conference Track

SSE12: Land-Use, Growth, and Development

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE12-491

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 4:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:45 PM Apr 4th, 4:00 PM

Performance of porous asphalt pavements: stormwater quantity and quality mitigation

Recent advances in several broadly allied scientific disciplines have shown that green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) can to some extent restore the natural pathways that stormwater takes from landscape to stream. Permeable pavements are one of several GSI techniques that are commonly used across the country to mitigate the effects of stormwater on downstream receiving waters. In the State of Washington, the use of GSI is mandated for any new or retrofit construction project that meets certain criteria. The talk will focus on performance studies of a 9-cell replicated asphalt pavement test facility that is installed at the Washington State University Puyallup Research and Extension Center Campus, Puyallup, WA. The asphalt test facility has 9 lined cells - 3 cells are constructed with conventional asphalt and 6 with porous asphalt. Runoff from the impervious cells acted as a control and were compared to runoff from the pervious cells. All water applied to the surface and that which infiltrated through the sub-base aggregate was monitored and collected at the outflow. Artificial and natural storm events were used to test both hydrologic and biogeochemical properties of the two systems. Pollutants evaluated were suspended sediments, metals, nutrients, and hydrocarbons. Results from this work show that porous asphalt pavements are able to infiltrate as much as 99.5% of incident rainfall. Additionally, preliminary results suggest that porous asphalt pavement systems are capable of considerable treatment of several key stormwater pollutants. This work will be presented in full at the conference.