Presentation Abstract

In 2013, King County initiated a long-term monitoring program of freshwater tissue contaminants in three major lakes (Lakes Sammamish, Washington, and Union) and two major rivers (Green and Cedar rivers). Tissue samples are collected from each waterbody every 5 years. Fillet and whole-body fish and invertebrate tissue chemistry data from this program are used to track changes over time associated with management actions, evaluate the risk of adverse effects to aquatic life, and inform human health risk evaluations of fish consumption. The first round of tissue monitoring from all three major lakes was completed in 2017. Species collected spanned a variety of trophic levels including small- and largemouth bass, cutthroat trout, northern pikeminnow, kokanee salmon, yellow perch, black crappie, peamouth, sculpins, largescale sucker and crayfish. Tissues were analyzed for mercury and other metals, PCBs, PBDEs and chlorinated pesticides. Persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) concentrations tended to be highest in Lake Union, and lowest in Lake Sammamish. Given higher levels of some PBTs in recreationally important species in Lake Union compared to Lake Washington, these chemicals may pose risk to human health from consumption; there is a state-issued fish consumption advisory for PCBs on some Lake Washington fish species. DDT, DDE and DDD were frequently detected and at higher levels in Lake Union compared to fish tissues from the other two lakes. The presentation will summarize highlights from these data.

Session Title

Persistent Organic Pollutants and PAHs in Freshwater & Marine Fish

Keywords

PCBs, PBDEs, Mercury, DDT, Bioaccumulation

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-614

Start Date

4-4-2018 3:45 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 4:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 3:45 PM Apr 4th, 4:00 PM

Persistent bioaccumulatives in freshwater fish of the Lake Washington watershed

In 2013, King County initiated a long-term monitoring program of freshwater tissue contaminants in three major lakes (Lakes Sammamish, Washington, and Union) and two major rivers (Green and Cedar rivers). Tissue samples are collected from each waterbody every 5 years. Fillet and whole-body fish and invertebrate tissue chemistry data from this program are used to track changes over time associated with management actions, evaluate the risk of adverse effects to aquatic life, and inform human health risk evaluations of fish consumption. The first round of tissue monitoring from all three major lakes was completed in 2017. Species collected spanned a variety of trophic levels including small- and largemouth bass, cutthroat trout, northern pikeminnow, kokanee salmon, yellow perch, black crappie, peamouth, sculpins, largescale sucker and crayfish. Tissues were analyzed for mercury and other metals, PCBs, PBDEs and chlorinated pesticides. Persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) concentrations tended to be highest in Lake Union, and lowest in Lake Sammamish. Given higher levels of some PBTs in recreationally important species in Lake Union compared to Lake Washington, these chemicals may pose risk to human health from consumption; there is a state-issued fish consumption advisory for PCBs on some Lake Washington fish species. DDT, DDE and DDD were frequently detected and at higher levels in Lake Union compared to fish tissues from the other two lakes. The presentation will summarize highlights from these data.