Event Title

Developing high performance bioretention media and media filter systems: water quality treatment performance to-date

Presentation Abstract

The Washington State Municipal Stormwater Permit requires the use of low impact development (LID) for large jurisdictions as of January 2017 and will require LID in 2018 for smaller jurisdictions across western Washington State. Consequently, the use of LID best management practices (BMPs) in both the public and private sector will increase dramatically in Washington State. Due to this trend away from traditional stormwater controls (e.g, wet ponds and vaults) and toward the use of LID BMPs, developing specifications and designs which maximize effective water quality treatment and runoff volume control to protect receiving waters is critical. To understand how well the LID approach protects receiving waters, effectiveness must be examined at various scales and with appropriate metrics. This presentation is part of a session that examines LID application and performance at the watershed, regional, BMP and aquatic organism level. Specifically, the presentation will: briefly outline the process for developing high performance bioretention and media filter systems; provide current water quality treatment performance data for primary media beds, chemically active polishing layers and integrated systems for ultra-high-performance water quality treatment; and next steps for development of these evolving systems.

Session Title

The Performance of Low Impact Development Applied Across Land Use Scales Using Flow Control, Water Quality and Biological Metrics

Conference Track

SSE12: Land-Use, Growth, and Development

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE12-213

Start Date

4-4-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 4:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 4:00 PM Apr 4th, 4:15 PM

Developing high performance bioretention media and media filter systems: water quality treatment performance to-date

The Washington State Municipal Stormwater Permit requires the use of low impact development (LID) for large jurisdictions as of January 2017 and will require LID in 2018 for smaller jurisdictions across western Washington State. Consequently, the use of LID best management practices (BMPs) in both the public and private sector will increase dramatically in Washington State. Due to this trend away from traditional stormwater controls (e.g, wet ponds and vaults) and toward the use of LID BMPs, developing specifications and designs which maximize effective water quality treatment and runoff volume control to protect receiving waters is critical. To understand how well the LID approach protects receiving waters, effectiveness must be examined at various scales and with appropriate metrics. This presentation is part of a session that examines LID application and performance at the watershed, regional, BMP and aquatic organism level. Specifically, the presentation will: briefly outline the process for developing high performance bioretention and media filter systems; provide current water quality treatment performance data for primary media beds, chemically active polishing layers and integrated systems for ultra-high-performance water quality treatment; and next steps for development of these evolving systems.