Presentation Abstract

Climate change and human interactions pose significant threats for the health of estuaries. In 2012 The Nature Conservancy (TNC) removed a dike at the mouth of the Stillaguamish river to restore ecosystem functioning and resilience to climate change. Monitoring reference zones is critical for contextualizing growth patterns in complicated systems like estuaries. The purpose of this study was to determine which reference zones were most similar to the restoration zone in Port Susan Bay. Using bulrush measurements collected during my internship with TNC, I used an excel T test to assess statistical similarity between zones based on the means of Bolboschoenus Species (river bulrush) and Schoenoplectus Pungens (3 square bulrush), percent cover, and combined bulrush biomass. Results showed that vegetation statistically matches natural reference site conditions, suggesting that the marsh has been restored to natural conditions. However, estuaries are heterogeneous ecosystems that have many confounding factors affecting marsh structure and similarity is a complicated question that varies depending on the variables examined.

Session Title

Track: Governance, Management & Funding – Posters

Conference Track

Governance, Management & Funding

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_5598

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

ASSESSING THE STATISTICAL SIMILARITY OF PORT SUSAN BAY RESTORATION AND REFERENCE SITES

Climate change and human interactions pose significant threats for the health of estuaries. In 2012 The Nature Conservancy (TNC) removed a dike at the mouth of the Stillaguamish river to restore ecosystem functioning and resilience to climate change. Monitoring reference zones is critical for contextualizing growth patterns in complicated systems like estuaries. The purpose of this study was to determine which reference zones were most similar to the restoration zone in Port Susan Bay. Using bulrush measurements collected during my internship with TNC, I used an excel T test to assess statistical similarity between zones based on the means of Bolboschoenus Species (river bulrush) and Schoenoplectus Pungens (3 square bulrush), percent cover, and combined bulrush biomass. Results showed that vegetation statistically matches natural reference site conditions, suggesting that the marsh has been restored to natural conditions. However, estuaries are heterogeneous ecosystems that have many confounding factors affecting marsh structure and similarity is a complicated question that varies depending on the variables examined.