Event Title

Evaluating the Concept of Baselines to Detect Ecosystem Recovery in Conditions of Climate Change

Streaming Media

Presentation Abstract

Scientists rely on baselines as a measure of ecosystem recovery, contingent on the assumption that the physical environment supporting ecosystem processes does not change and that baselines can been formulated over sufficiently long and representative time scales to encompass the natural variability of a given system. Long-term aquatic monitoring programs, however, struggle with finding the appropriate baselines because new long-term patterns of variability emerge as the dataset continues to grow. The concept of shifting baselines has been applied in other marine environments (e.g., The Shifting Baselines Ocean Media Project that grew from its three founding partners - Scripps Institution of Oceanography, The Ocean Conservancy, and Surfrider Foundation), motivating us to figure out how such approaches can be specifically adapted to the Salish Sea temperature and salinity records. Given that the climate-land-ocean connection sensitively impacts physical processes in the Salish Sea through hydrological cycles, the use of baselines in context of ecosystem recovery has to be pragmatically addressed.

Session Title

Climate Change and Marine Response

Conference Track

Climate & Ocean Condition Changes

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_5483

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

Evaluating the Concept of Baselines to Detect Ecosystem Recovery in Conditions of Climate Change

Scientists rely on baselines as a measure of ecosystem recovery, contingent on the assumption that the physical environment supporting ecosystem processes does not change and that baselines can been formulated over sufficiently long and representative time scales to encompass the natural variability of a given system. Long-term aquatic monitoring programs, however, struggle with finding the appropriate baselines because new long-term patterns of variability emerge as the dataset continues to grow. The concept of shifting baselines has been applied in other marine environments (e.g., The Shifting Baselines Ocean Media Project that grew from its three founding partners - Scripps Institution of Oceanography, The Ocean Conservancy, and Surfrider Foundation), motivating us to figure out how such approaches can be specifically adapted to the Salish Sea temperature and salinity records. Given that the climate-land-ocean connection sensitively impacts physical processes in the Salish Sea through hydrological cycles, the use of baselines in context of ecosystem recovery has to be pragmatically addressed.