Event Title

Examples of Puget Sound Soft Shore and Armor Alternative Projects

Streaming Media

Presentation Abstract

This poster will increase awareness of Washington Department of Ecology’s online tool for viewing shoreline projects that removed hard armor or used an alternative to hard shoreline stabilization. Washington’s Puget Sound has 2,600 miles of coastline, and 27% (about 700 miles) is armored by bulkheads, rock revetments, or sea walls. Throughout Washington, shoreline property owners have often installed these structures to help stabilize the shoreline, control erosion and protect—or “hard armor”—coastal development. However, shoreline armoring can have negative effects on coastal processes, disturb habitat, and disconnect ecosystems. Despite momentum from agencies, tribes, and local non-profits to reduce shoreline armor and remove unnecessary bulkheads, many shoreline property owners may not recognize the risks associated with armoring the shoreline. Additionally, they may not know that there are softer alternatives to bulkheads, such as beach nourishment or the use of woody debris. To address these gaps and needs, the WA Department of Ecology developed an online application—Examples of Puget Sound Soft Shore and Armor Alternative Projects—to highlight dozens of beaches where hard shoreline armoring was removed or softer alternatives were used. In some cases, these environmentally friendly alternatives have been in place for decades. The audience for this tool includes shoreline property owners, local government staff who interact with homeowners, and anyone curious about erosion on Puget Sound. By highlighting successful examples of shoreline armor removal and soft shore alternatives, we can change the conversation that property owners have about shoreline stabilization.

Session Title

Track: Shorelines, Estuaries & Rivers – Posters

Conference Track

Shorelines, Estuaries & Rivers

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_3714

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

Examples of Puget Sound Soft Shore and Armor Alternative Projects

This poster will increase awareness of Washington Department of Ecology’s online tool for viewing shoreline projects that removed hard armor or used an alternative to hard shoreline stabilization. Washington’s Puget Sound has 2,600 miles of coastline, and 27% (about 700 miles) is armored by bulkheads, rock revetments, or sea walls. Throughout Washington, shoreline property owners have often installed these structures to help stabilize the shoreline, control erosion and protect—or “hard armor”—coastal development. However, shoreline armoring can have negative effects on coastal processes, disturb habitat, and disconnect ecosystems. Despite momentum from agencies, tribes, and local non-profits to reduce shoreline armor and remove unnecessary bulkheads, many shoreline property owners may not recognize the risks associated with armoring the shoreline. Additionally, they may not know that there are softer alternatives to bulkheads, such as beach nourishment or the use of woody debris. To address these gaps and needs, the WA Department of Ecology developed an online application—Examples of Puget Sound Soft Shore and Armor Alternative Projects—to highlight dozens of beaches where hard shoreline armoring was removed or softer alternatives were used. In some cases, these environmentally friendly alternatives have been in place for decades. The audience for this tool includes shoreline property owners, local government staff who interact with homeowners, and anyone curious about erosion on Puget Sound. By highlighting successful examples of shoreline armor removal and soft shore alternatives, we can change the conversation that property owners have about shoreline stabilization.