Event Title

Investigating the contribution of kelp- and eelgrass-derived carbon and nitrogen to marine herbivores and carnivores in Puget Sound.

Streaming Media

Presentation Abstract

In the Salish Sea Nereocystis luetkeana (bull kelp) and Zostera marina (eelgrass) are highly productive and because of their three-dimensional size and structure are reported to provide shelter for a variety of valued Puget Sound species, including Species of Concern like Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and quillback rockfish, Sebastes maliger. Less understood is the extent to which bull kelp forests and eelgrass beds are a source of energy for invertebrates and fishes. To answer this question we conducted a project in 2018 and 2019 to reconstruct the trophic linkages among kelp, seagrass, and several herbivorous and carnivorous species, including rockfish. We used stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to estimate the kelp- and eelgrass-derived isotope contributions to invertebrate and fish tissue. Understanding these connections, and their strengths, is necessary for effective management and recovery. In this presentation we will place our findings in the context of ongoing kelp recovery plans.

Session Title

Session 2.2A: Kelp: Stressors, Trends, and Value (Part II)

Conference Track

Kelp & Seagrass

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_3901

Start Date

22-4-2020 12:30 PM

End Date

22-4-2020 2:00 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 22nd, 12:30 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Investigating the contribution of kelp- and eelgrass-derived carbon and nitrogen to marine herbivores and carnivores in Puget Sound.

In the Salish Sea Nereocystis luetkeana (bull kelp) and Zostera marina (eelgrass) are highly productive and because of their three-dimensional size and structure are reported to provide shelter for a variety of valued Puget Sound species, including Species of Concern like Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and quillback rockfish, Sebastes maliger. Less understood is the extent to which bull kelp forests and eelgrass beds are a source of energy for invertebrates and fishes. To answer this question we conducted a project in 2018 and 2019 to reconstruct the trophic linkages among kelp, seagrass, and several herbivorous and carnivorous species, including rockfish. We used stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to estimate the kelp- and eelgrass-derived isotope contributions to invertebrate and fish tissue. Understanding these connections, and their strengths, is necessary for effective management and recovery. In this presentation we will place our findings in the context of ongoing kelp recovery plans.