Presentation Abstract

Pacific Northwest coasts are exposed to coastal inundation as a result of storm surge and large waves induced by extreme weather events. Accurate coastal risk projections depend on detailed and accurate information on sea level rise, including waves and storm surge under extreme weather events. This paper presents a modeling study simulating the wave climate and storm surge distribution in the Salish Sea. The Salish Sea wave model is configured with the SWAN model, driven by spectral open boundary conditions from the nested regional WaveWatch3 models and sea surface winds from a 6-km resolution Weather Research and Forecasting simulation. A series of historical storm surge events were identified for model simulations based on observed water levels at a number of NOAA tide gauges. Model simulations corresponding to selected storm surge events were conducted. Sensitivity analysis on the effect of local wind forcing was conducted. Both wave and storm surge models were validated with observed data at NOAA buoys and tide gauges. Wave climate and storm surge height in the major basins of the Salish Sea are analyzed. The maximum wave height and storm surge magnitude are mapped in the Salish Sea and areas exposed to large waves and high storm surge are identified based on model results. Results how that surge is remarkably uniform across Puget Sound, with the exception of a few locations, such as Sinclair Inlet, Liberty Bay and Oakland Bay that experience above-average surge because of the unique geometries of the bays. Waves in the Strait of Juan de Fuca are dominated by long swells, which dissipate significantly as propagating into Puget Sound. waves in Puget Sound are small and primarily contributed by wind-sea; peak periods are generally less than 5 s and maximum significant wave heights are less than 2.0 m.

Session Title

Salish Sea Models for Circulation and Water Quality – New Developments and Diagnostic Applications

Conference Track

Data Analysis, Modeling & Decision Making

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_3726

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

Mapping Waves and Storm Surge for Coastal Resilience in the Salish Sea

Pacific Northwest coasts are exposed to coastal inundation as a result of storm surge and large waves induced by extreme weather events. Accurate coastal risk projections depend on detailed and accurate information on sea level rise, including waves and storm surge under extreme weather events. This paper presents a modeling study simulating the wave climate and storm surge distribution in the Salish Sea. The Salish Sea wave model is configured with the SWAN model, driven by spectral open boundary conditions from the nested regional WaveWatch3 models and sea surface winds from a 6-km resolution Weather Research and Forecasting simulation. A series of historical storm surge events were identified for model simulations based on observed water levels at a number of NOAA tide gauges. Model simulations corresponding to selected storm surge events were conducted. Sensitivity analysis on the effect of local wind forcing was conducted. Both wave and storm surge models were validated with observed data at NOAA buoys and tide gauges. Wave climate and storm surge height in the major basins of the Salish Sea are analyzed. The maximum wave height and storm surge magnitude are mapped in the Salish Sea and areas exposed to large waves and high storm surge are identified based on model results. Results how that surge is remarkably uniform across Puget Sound, with the exception of a few locations, such as Sinclair Inlet, Liberty Bay and Oakland Bay that experience above-average surge because of the unique geometries of the bays. Waves in the Strait of Juan de Fuca are dominated by long swells, which dissipate significantly as propagating into Puget Sound. waves in Puget Sound are small and primarily contributed by wind-sea; peak periods are generally less than 5 s and maximum significant wave heights are less than 2.0 m.