Presentation Abstract

The re-occurrence of bloom observations of coccolithophores, Emiliania huxleyi, that were seen in the Hood Canal from 2006-2008 and resurfaced in 2016-2019 have raised concerns about adverse effects on marine shellfish resources. Crab and shrimp test fishery and catch data, together with observations of intertidal clam and oyster populations have raised the alarm with the tribal community and resource managers that the blooms adversely impacts these resources. The Skokomish Tribe has been collecting oceanographic, environmental and biological data to understand the possible causes and effects of the recurring events of the coccolithophore blooms in Hood Canal. Canal-specific oceanographic data compiled by various monitoring entities have been re-analyzed, and biological and physical characteristics of the coccolithophore bloom water have been studied during the bloom events, including light attenuation profiles, phytoplankton community, chlorophyll a, temperature, and salinity. This poster will summarize our data collection activities and relevant information concerning the coccolithophore blooms in Hood Canal.

Session Title

Track: Data Analysis, Modeling & Decision Making – Posters

Conference Track

Data Analysis, Modeling & Decision Making

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_5696

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

Monitoring Coccolithophore blooms in Hood Canal

The re-occurrence of bloom observations of coccolithophores, Emiliania huxleyi, that were seen in the Hood Canal from 2006-2008 and resurfaced in 2016-2019 have raised concerns about adverse effects on marine shellfish resources. Crab and shrimp test fishery and catch data, together with observations of intertidal clam and oyster populations have raised the alarm with the tribal community and resource managers that the blooms adversely impacts these resources. The Skokomish Tribe has been collecting oceanographic, environmental and biological data to understand the possible causes and effects of the recurring events of the coccolithophore blooms in Hood Canal. Canal-specific oceanographic data compiled by various monitoring entities have been re-analyzed, and biological and physical characteristics of the coccolithophore bloom water have been studied during the bloom events, including light attenuation profiles, phytoplankton community, chlorophyll a, temperature, and salinity. This poster will summarize our data collection activities and relevant information concerning the coccolithophore blooms in Hood Canal.