Presentation Abstract

As a component of a greater effort to assess the status and trends of ecological resources within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, a monitoring network of mussel watch sites was initiated in winter of 2010 and has continued every-other-year through 2018. Twenty-five indigenous bivalve monitoring sites were sampled biennially for a total of five campaigns. Indigenous mussels (Mytilus spp.) were collected at sites located near suspected sources (industrial, wastewater, and storm water outfalls; marinas, stream mouths, and other sources) as well as sites that were representative of ambient conditions in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, the adjoining passages, and Liberty Bay in the Puget Sound, Washington. The objectives of this monitoring were to evaluate tissue concentrations to determine the spatial distribution of contamination, evaluate temporal trends, assess exposure levels in relation to screening benchmarks, and identify locations where corrective actions may be warranted. Whole body tissue samples were analyzed for trace metals (Hg, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe, and Zn), 42 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs), 21 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), lipid content, length, and stable isotopes of C and N. Tissue residue data from the monitoring network were evaluated to assess spatial differences, evaluate trends, assess potential ecological impacts, and compare the results to regional and national data sets. Ecological effects were evaluated by comparing residue levels to Critical Body Residue (CBR) thresholds of mussel tissue concentrations below which effects to mussel growth, reproduction, and survival are not expected. Results showed that mussel tissue residues were below CBR benchmarks at most locations, however there were sites that had elevated levels of PAHs, PCBs, Hg, and Cu. An overall decreasing trend in contaminant levels for most sites indicated improving environmental quality. The monitoring framework provides a context for identifying problems and evaluating the effectiveness of corrective actions.

Session Title

Session 1.1B: The Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry of the Salish Sea Ecosystem

Conference Track

Contaminants, Plastics, Microplastics, Toxicology & Stormwater

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_3999

Start Date

21-4-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

21-4-2020 12:00 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 10:30 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Results from biennial mussel watch monitoring in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington from 2010 to 2018

As a component of a greater effort to assess the status and trends of ecological resources within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, a monitoring network of mussel watch sites was initiated in winter of 2010 and has continued every-other-year through 2018. Twenty-five indigenous bivalve monitoring sites were sampled biennially for a total of five campaigns. Indigenous mussels (Mytilus spp.) were collected at sites located near suspected sources (industrial, wastewater, and storm water outfalls; marinas, stream mouths, and other sources) as well as sites that were representative of ambient conditions in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, the adjoining passages, and Liberty Bay in the Puget Sound, Washington. The objectives of this monitoring were to evaluate tissue concentrations to determine the spatial distribution of contamination, evaluate temporal trends, assess exposure levels in relation to screening benchmarks, and identify locations where corrective actions may be warranted. Whole body tissue samples were analyzed for trace metals (Hg, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe, and Zn), 42 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs), 21 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), lipid content, length, and stable isotopes of C and N. Tissue residue data from the monitoring network were evaluated to assess spatial differences, evaluate trends, assess potential ecological impacts, and compare the results to regional and national data sets. Ecological effects were evaluated by comparing residue levels to Critical Body Residue (CBR) thresholds of mussel tissue concentrations below which effects to mussel growth, reproduction, and survival are not expected. Results showed that mussel tissue residues were below CBR benchmarks at most locations, however there were sites that had elevated levels of PAHs, PCBs, Hg, and Cu. An overall decreasing trend in contaminant levels for most sites indicated improving environmental quality. The monitoring framework provides a context for identifying problems and evaluating the effectiveness of corrective actions.