Event Title

Spatial and Temporal Persistence of Nearshore Kelp Beds on the West Coast of British Columbia, Canada using Satellite Remote Sensing.

Streaming Media

Presentation Abstract

Spatial and Temporal Persistence of Nearshore Kelp Beds on the West Coast of British Columbia, Canada using Satellite Remote Sensing. Sarah Schroeder, Leanna Boyer, Francis Juanes, Maycira Costa A time series of high-resolution satellite imagery from 2004-2017 was used to detect floating bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) in the nearshore region of coastal British Columbia. Kelp persistence over time was calculated and the spatial trends relating to environmental conditions of substrate, temperature and currents were examined. Areas with both high currents and rocky substrate had the highest kelp extent and greatest persistence, while those regions with either low currents or gravel substrate had higher variability and lower kelp persistence. Temporal changes were compared to anomalies in sea surface temperatures and while no direct pattern of kelp loss was linked to temperature, a possible lag effect may have occurred where high temperatures in the previous year resulted in lower kelp presence the following season. Overall, a decline in kelp extent was measured from a high in 2015 to a low in 2017.

Session Title

Session 2.1A: Kelp: Stressors, Trends, and Value (Part I)

Conference Track

Kelp & Seagrass

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_4201

Start Date

22-4-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 12:00 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 22nd, 10:30 AM Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM

Spatial and Temporal Persistence of Nearshore Kelp Beds on the West Coast of British Columbia, Canada using Satellite Remote Sensing.

Spatial and Temporal Persistence of Nearshore Kelp Beds on the West Coast of British Columbia, Canada using Satellite Remote Sensing. Sarah Schroeder, Leanna Boyer, Francis Juanes, Maycira Costa A time series of high-resolution satellite imagery from 2004-2017 was used to detect floating bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) in the nearshore region of coastal British Columbia. Kelp persistence over time was calculated and the spatial trends relating to environmental conditions of substrate, temperature and currents were examined. Areas with both high currents and rocky substrate had the highest kelp extent and greatest persistence, while those regions with either low currents or gravel substrate had higher variability and lower kelp persistence. Temporal changes were compared to anomalies in sea surface temperatures and while no direct pattern of kelp loss was linked to temperature, a possible lag effect may have occurred where high temperatures in the previous year resulted in lower kelp presence the following season. Overall, a decline in kelp extent was measured from a high in 2015 to a low in 2017.