Presentation Abstract

Between 2006 and 2010, Moore et al. (2013) conducted an acoustic tagging study to evaluate early marine survival of outmigrating steelhead. Results of that study showed high mortality near the Hood Canal Bridge, ranging between 0 and 36%, which led to the formation of the Hood Canal Bridge Assessment Team. The Assessment Team set out to examine water quality, predator presence, and physical aspects of the bridge structure as they related to steelhead outmigration in 2017 and 2018. As part of the Team, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe used a variety of sampling techniques to characterize biota assemblage, abundance, and distribution to provide context between tagged steelhead and other biota associated with the bridge. Observations made as a result of video and visual surveys demonstrated that juvenile Chum and Chinook Salmon were abundant for extended periods of time along the length of the bridge. The increased residence time we observed appeared to increase susceptibility to predation. The Hood Canal Bridge, a significant man-made structure, has serious potential implications for migrating salmonids in the Hood Canal ecosystem.

Session Title

Track: Salmon Biology & Management – Posters

Conference Track

Salmon Biology & Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_4538

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

The Hood Canal Bridge Impedes Migration of Juvenile Salmonids

Between 2006 and 2010, Moore et al. (2013) conducted an acoustic tagging study to evaluate early marine survival of outmigrating steelhead. Results of that study showed high mortality near the Hood Canal Bridge, ranging between 0 and 36%, which led to the formation of the Hood Canal Bridge Assessment Team. The Assessment Team set out to examine water quality, predator presence, and physical aspects of the bridge structure as they related to steelhead outmigration in 2017 and 2018. As part of the Team, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe used a variety of sampling techniques to characterize biota assemblage, abundance, and distribution to provide context between tagged steelhead and other biota associated with the bridge. Observations made as a result of video and visual surveys demonstrated that juvenile Chum and Chinook Salmon were abundant for extended periods of time along the length of the bridge. The increased residence time we observed appeared to increase susceptibility to predation. The Hood Canal Bridge, a significant man-made structure, has serious potential implications for migrating salmonids in the Hood Canal ecosystem.