Presentation Abstract

The environment needs communications and engagement programs that are as professional as other environmental projects. STORM (Stormwater Outreach for Regional Municipalities) offers a model for environmental professionals on: 1. Crowd sourcing engagement and action, 2. Sharing a learning environment on best practices, 3. How collaboration adds up to resources, partners, training and impact. Projects of any size can use these approaches to improve outreach. STORM collaborates to design, create and evaluate programs that engage diverse audiences in environmental actions. Over 83 jurisdictions and nonprofit partners use the collective action model to deliver award winning programs. Examples of these techniques will come from those programs: Don't Drip and Drive, Puget Sound Starts Here, Natural Yard Care, STORM Fest, LatinX audience research, and the Resource Reservoir, an online library and web strategy. The teams use social marketing frameworks to develop effective, measurable programs that follow steps familiar to environmental projects: research, design, strategy, implementation, evaluation. Those resources are available to partners and the public to use. Historically, effective outreach design has not been a focus of environmental investment, research or training. The STORM collaborative fills this gap by working systematically to empower members and residents to address environmental issues. Membership work groups chose to focus on specific issues, and share resources that allow a greater impact and reach. The STORM collaborative helps jurisdictions to share the load of addressing large-scale regional water quality issues and engagement. It is a model for working together for environmental action and making the work of environmental professionals relevant to their communities. There is the perception that social marketing or behavior change programs cannot be measured or do not work, that inclusion of new communities is challenging. Like many environmental issues, change can be incremental, but powerful, and new practices can be used address new challenges.

Session Title

Local Networks Generate Innovative Recovery Actions

Conference Track

Education, Community & Social Science

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2020 : Online)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

2020_abstractID_4545

Start Date

21-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 4:45 PM

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 22nd, 4:45 PM

Using the collaborative model of STORM for impact and environmental engagement

The environment needs communications and engagement programs that are as professional as other environmental projects. STORM (Stormwater Outreach for Regional Municipalities) offers a model for environmental professionals on: 1. Crowd sourcing engagement and action, 2. Sharing a learning environment on best practices, 3. How collaboration adds up to resources, partners, training and impact. Projects of any size can use these approaches to improve outreach. STORM collaborates to design, create and evaluate programs that engage diverse audiences in environmental actions. Over 83 jurisdictions and nonprofit partners use the collective action model to deliver award winning programs. Examples of these techniques will come from those programs: Don't Drip and Drive, Puget Sound Starts Here, Natural Yard Care, STORM Fest, LatinX audience research, and the Resource Reservoir, an online library and web strategy. The teams use social marketing frameworks to develop effective, measurable programs that follow steps familiar to environmental projects: research, design, strategy, implementation, evaluation. Those resources are available to partners and the public to use. Historically, effective outreach design has not been a focus of environmental investment, research or training. The STORM collaborative fills this gap by working systematically to empower members and residents to address environmental issues. Membership work groups chose to focus on specific issues, and share resources that allow a greater impact and reach. The STORM collaborative helps jurisdictions to share the load of addressing large-scale regional water quality issues and engagement. It is a model for working together for environmental action and making the work of environmental professionals relevant to their communities. There is the perception that social marketing or behavior change programs cannot be measured or do not work, that inclusion of new communities is challenging. Like many environmental issues, change can be incremental, but powerful, and new practices can be used address new challenges.