Description

Development and urban growth within the Fraser Lowlands in both Canada and the United States, is putting increased pressure on shared water resources. The transboundary nature of surface watersheds and aquifers creates a dynamic management situation. Mismatched responsibility between levels of government in British Columbian B.C. and Washington State (WA) and different policy regarding management of watershed and aquifer use and protection can lead to conflict between watershed users at local and international levels. For example, a lack record of surface and groundwater withdrawal rates for private individuals in B.C has led to an information void. This has implications for management regarding flow rates of transboundary surface watersheds, as well as sources of long-term transboundary aquifer depletion. This paper explores management policy on both sides of the border, as it pertains to individual, community and province/state rights to surface and groundwater withdrawal, and the implications this has on transboundary water management.

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Subject - LCSH

Water-supply--Fraser Lowland (B.C. and Wash.)--Management; Water resources development--Fraser Lowland (B.C. and Wash.); Sustainable development--Fraser Lowland (B.C. and Wash.);

Geographic Coverage

Fraser Lowland (B.C. and Wash.)

Genre/Form

Conference Papers and Proceedings

Session

Borderlands in the Northwest: Policy and Management

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Digital Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

event

Included in

Geography Commons

Share

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Groundwater and surface mangement in the Fraser Lowlands: policy and rights

Development and urban growth within the Fraser Lowlands in both Canada and the United States, is putting increased pressure on shared water resources. The transboundary nature of surface watersheds and aquifers creates a dynamic management situation. Mismatched responsibility between levels of government in British Columbian B.C. and Washington State (WA) and different policy regarding management of watershed and aquifer use and protection can lead to conflict between watershed users at local and international levels. For example, a lack record of surface and groundwater withdrawal rates for private individuals in B.C has led to an information void. This has implications for management regarding flow rates of transboundary surface watersheds, as well as sources of long-term transboundary aquifer depletion. This paper explores management policy on both sides of the border, as it pertains to individual, community and province/state rights to surface and groundwater withdrawal, and the implications this has on transboundary water management.