Event Title

Effects of fire on cheatgrass distribution in North Cascades National Park

Description

The presence of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), a highly invasive grass species, has been documented in North Cascades National Park (NOCA). Studies show that disturbances such as fire increase the ability of cheatgrass to establish, expand, and create an invasive plant-fire regime cycle. It is imperative that the effects of fire on cheatgrass are better understood in conjunction with prescribed burning efforts in the park so that further invasion does not offset ecological benefits of fire. Preliminary data analysis from the 2006 Flick Creek Fire indicates that within the first year following the fire, cheatgrass expanded its range within burned areas. A comparative watershed analysis and statistical equation model will be used to examine data collected within the burn perimeter and adjacent areas, in addition to burn severity data. These analyses will help determine the effects of fire, burn severity, and other factors on cheatgrass invasion. Findings may enable park managers to better mitigate for impacts of fire on cheatgrass invasion.

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Subject - LCSH

Cheatgrass brome--Effect of fires on--Washington (State)--North Cascades National Park; Invasive plants--Washington (State)--North Cascades National Park

Geographic Coverage

North Cascades National Park (Wash.)

Genre/Form

Abstracts

Session

Ecological Analysis and Restoration

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Digital Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

event

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Effects of fire on cheatgrass distribution in North Cascades National Park

The presence of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), a highly invasive grass species, has been documented in North Cascades National Park (NOCA). Studies show that disturbances such as fire increase the ability of cheatgrass to establish, expand, and create an invasive plant-fire regime cycle. It is imperative that the effects of fire on cheatgrass are better understood in conjunction with prescribed burning efforts in the park so that further invasion does not offset ecological benefits of fire. Preliminary data analysis from the 2006 Flick Creek Fire indicates that within the first year following the fire, cheatgrass expanded its range within burned areas. A comparative watershed analysis and statistical equation model will be used to examine data collected within the burn perimeter and adjacent areas, in addition to burn severity data. These analyses will help determine the effects of fire, burn severity, and other factors on cheatgrass invasion. Findings may enable park managers to better mitigate for impacts of fire on cheatgrass invasion.