Event Title

Putting the ecology back into political ecology

Description

Some scholars have lamented that the broadening of political ecology has become 'politics without ecology' (Walker, 2005; Bassett & Zimmerer, 2004). However, this paper contributes to the growing literature that integrates the biophysical as an essential component in the analysis of resource conservation and development programs. Consideration of the biophysical characteristics of the various plants that have been included in India's conservation minded medicinal plant ex-situ cultivation program provides a significantly broader and deeper understanding of the differentiated consequences that result from the program's implementation than considering political economic factors alone. This paper compares the two medicinal plants that received the bulk of the subsidies in the cultivation scheme and shows how the biological differences of each plant greatly influenced each species' unique environmental, livelihood and economic impacts. This paper concludes with recommendations to include biophysical factors in the design of resource and conservation development programs

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Subject - LCSH

Political ecology--Management--India

Geographic Coverage

India

Genre/Form

Conference Papers and Proceedings

Session

Political Geographies

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Digital Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

event

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Putting the ecology back into political ecology

Some scholars have lamented that the broadening of political ecology has become 'politics without ecology' (Walker, 2005; Bassett & Zimmerer, 2004). However, this paper contributes to the growing literature that integrates the biophysical as an essential component in the analysis of resource conservation and development programs. Consideration of the biophysical characteristics of the various plants that have been included in India's conservation minded medicinal plant ex-situ cultivation program provides a significantly broader and deeper understanding of the differentiated consequences that result from the program's implementation than considering political economic factors alone. This paper compares the two medicinal plants that received the bulk of the subsidies in the cultivation scheme and shows how the biological differences of each plant greatly influenced each species' unique environmental, livelihood and economic impacts. This paper concludes with recommendations to include biophysical factors in the design of resource and conservation development programs