Event Title

Jumping into the unkown: the stress of female newcomers' adjustment to life in Toronto and their implications for delivering primary mental health care

Description

Following migration to Canada, female newcomers must endure a process of resettlement that often is accompanied by considerable stress, creating vulnerability towards related disorders and mental ill-health. Due to socio-cultural and linguistic barriers, women are more likely than men to experience feelings of isolation and distress during this resettlement process. Therefore, it is important to ensure that mental health care is accessible for them. This study examines sources of mental stress and distress female newcomers experience in adjusting to a new place, Toronto, and to a new health care system. Importantly, this adjustment is framed as a process that occurs over time and place. As part of a larger community-based participatory action research study, this analysis draws upon 30 semi-structured interviews conducted with female newcomers from 4 cultural-linguistic groups. Thematic findings indicate major sources of stress in adjusting to life in Toronto include: navigation, concerns regarding personal safety, adapting to a new lifestyle, and finding and maintaining employment. In adjusting to Canada's health care system, sources of stress include: learning how to access care; not having access to specialists; and adapting to a new culture of care. Conclusions consider implications of these findings for delivering primary mental health care.

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Subject - LCSH

Women immigrants--Mental health--Ontario--Toronto; Women immigrants--Health aspects--Ontario--Toronto

Geographic Coverage

Toronto (Ont.)

Genre/Form

Posters

Session

Poster Session

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Digital Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

event

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Jumping into the unkown: the stress of female newcomers' adjustment to life in Toronto and their implications for delivering primary mental health care

Following migration to Canada, female newcomers must endure a process of resettlement that often is accompanied by considerable stress, creating vulnerability towards related disorders and mental ill-health. Due to socio-cultural and linguistic barriers, women are more likely than men to experience feelings of isolation and distress during this resettlement process. Therefore, it is important to ensure that mental health care is accessible for them. This study examines sources of mental stress and distress female newcomers experience in adjusting to a new place, Toronto, and to a new health care system. Importantly, this adjustment is framed as a process that occurs over time and place. As part of a larger community-based participatory action research study, this analysis draws upon 30 semi-structured interviews conducted with female newcomers from 4 cultural-linguistic groups. Thematic findings indicate major sources of stress in adjusting to life in Toronto include: navigation, concerns regarding personal safety, adapting to a new lifestyle, and finding and maintaining employment. In adjusting to Canada's health care system, sources of stress include: learning how to access care; not having access to specialists; and adapting to a new culture of care. Conclusions consider implications of these findings for delivering primary mental health care.