Event Title

Impact of black cottonwood on nutrient dynamics and soil properties in a British Columbia coniferous forest

Description

Black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. and Gray) is a native and common tree of mixed forests in coastal southern British Columbia. Traditionally black cottonwood has been managed against by forest managers who view it as a competitor to economically important conifers. This study examined the influence of black cottonwood on soils within a conifer forest to determine if its presence may improve soil nutrition. Seven paired plots were used to examine the influence of cottonwood on physical and chemical properties of the forest floor and mineral soil. Compared to conifer plots cottonwood plots had a higher percentage of mull humus forms and a lower percentage of moder humus forms. This higher abundance of mull humus forms beneath cottonwood suggests that nutrients may cycle faster and have increased availability in conifer forest where cottonwood is allowed to persist. The forest floor beneath cottonwood was also significantly less acidic than that of pure conifer stands which may indicate a faster rate of decomposition and increased nutrient availability. The C:N ratio within the mineral soil was lower under the influence of cottonwood compared to pure conifer stands, which suggests that nitrogen availability may be greater where cottonwood is a component of the stand.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

Subject - LCSH

Black cottonwood--British Columbia; Conifers--British Columbia; Soils--nitrogen content--British Columbia; Soils--Humic acid content--British Columbia;

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Session

Forest Science II

Genre/Form

Abstracts

Type

event

Geographic Coverage

British Columbia

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Keywords

Populus trichocarpa, forest soil, conifer

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Impact of black cottonwood on nutrient dynamics and soil properties in a British Columbia coniferous forest

Black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. and Gray) is a native and common tree of mixed forests in coastal southern British Columbia. Traditionally black cottonwood has been managed against by forest managers who view it as a competitor to economically important conifers. This study examined the influence of black cottonwood on soils within a conifer forest to determine if its presence may improve soil nutrition. Seven paired plots were used to examine the influence of cottonwood on physical and chemical properties of the forest floor and mineral soil. Compared to conifer plots cottonwood plots had a higher percentage of mull humus forms and a lower percentage of moder humus forms. This higher abundance of mull humus forms beneath cottonwood suggests that nutrients may cycle faster and have increased availability in conifer forest where cottonwood is allowed to persist. The forest floor beneath cottonwood was also significantly less acidic than that of pure conifer stands which may indicate a faster rate of decomposition and increased nutrient availability. The C:N ratio within the mineral soil was lower under the influence of cottonwood compared to pure conifer stands, which suggests that nitrogen availability may be greater where cottonwood is a component of the stand.