Event Title

What's going on? A study and critique of geography's history in Canadian universities

Description

Although geography was first taught in Canadian universities in 1800, it has only been regularly taught since the 1880s. The first geography department was not founded until 1935, with the first geography degree granted in 1943. Currently, however, there are some 50 geography departments in the country, with over half of those offering graduate studies. There have also been major changes in recent years to cirricula, enrollment types, and the composition of the professorate. The Canadian geographic academe has also created particular niches for itself in the worldwide geographic community. We will examine the history of geographic instruction in Canadian universities to the present, and in particular examine recent trends in that historical process with a view to its current and future implications.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

Subject - LCSH

Geography--Study and teaching (Higher)--History--Canada

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Session

Social and Cultural Geographies

Genre/Form

Abstracts

Type

event

Geographic Coverage

Canada

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Keywords

education, history, enrollment, professorate, cirriculum

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

What's going on? A study and critique of geography's history in Canadian universities

Although geography was first taught in Canadian universities in 1800, it has only been regularly taught since the 1880s. The first geography department was not founded until 1935, with the first geography degree granted in 1943. Currently, however, there are some 50 geography departments in the country, with over half of those offering graduate studies. There have also been major changes in recent years to cirricula, enrollment types, and the composition of the professorate. The Canadian geographic academe has also created particular niches for itself in the worldwide geographic community. We will examine the history of geographic instruction in Canadian universities to the present, and in particular examine recent trends in that historical process with a view to its current and future implications.